Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
10

The price difference was indeed entirely in the packaging. The important thing to remember about mask ROMs is that, though the setup costs and lead times were high, they had the lowest marginal cost of any form of memory. The reasons behind this are fairly clear if you look through this ROM, EPROM, & EEPROM Technology document from Integrated Circuit ...


4

There is most definitely no technical reason. And since some NES games featured different colours than just grey (think Zelda), it can't be based on some licensing directive either. Once the forms for the enclosure are made, there is no substantial cost in choosing any specific colour. Japanese games do show this quite nice. So there can't be no financial ...


3

There's a recent improvement in C64 fast loading technology made by Linus Åkesson. The main idea is to decode GCR inside 1541 thus gaining more transfer speed. An introductory article into the problems of GCR decoding inside 1541 (with the memory for both code and data of just 2048 bytes) is here: https://www.linusakesson.net/programming/gcr-decoding/index....


3

Here are the ones I've come across: SDOS V1.1, a "C64 disk utility and speed loader," which has had development done on it as recently as 2019. According to the readme, it's "Public Domain: open-source and freeware." It's based on earlier programs "VDOS" (1986), "SJLOAD (v0.96)" (2008-2009) and "SDOS (v1.0)" (2016). I discovered it on csdb.dk, but the ...


3

The story I have always heard (I will try to find and add sources later) is that in the wake of the 1983 video game crash, which primarily affected the US, Nintendo decided to re-evaluate their North American branding, and what they decided on was to avoid as far as possible any association with the console being a toy. Thus the NES is an "Entertainment ...


3

As said in the Raffzahn's answer, it's mostly a marketting or design choice and has no technicalities. First, you are mistaken in beliving all western NES cartridges were gray : They were some games released in gold cartridges as well. But you're right in that it's still much less varied than the famicom which featured countless different colours. In the ...


1

The CARDBOARD/5 was an expansion unit released no later than 1985. Appendix A of its manual discusses enabling more than one cartridge at once. They mention 80-column display interfaces and IEEE-488 bus interfaces (for connecting to PET peripherals) as usable simultaneously with other cartridges. They provide a detailed description of handling the situation ...


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