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75

If I understand it, in order to do that the entirety of the game engine would have to be supplied, but the content itself would have to be limited. How did that limit happen, Simply by not supplying the further content. Works well with any application that uses a clean separation of content and engine. No matter if it'a PDF reader, a HTML Browser or, well, ...


32

Mode 7 is just an image warp — the programmer sets a 2d offset that is applied between each pixel and the next when proceeding in raster order. That allows 2d rotation and scaling to be applied; if you change the start position and scale per line then that’s how you get a flat perspective plane. Doom can’t make use of this for at least two reasons: it would ...


28

In Doom’s case, the game was split into episodes, each split into multiple levels. The shareware (free trial) version of the game included the first episode only; a further two episodes were provided in the paid-for version. The game didn’t have to figure out whether you were somewhere “allowed” in the game — all the content provided was allowed. This was a ...


28

suppose it's possible that the PlayStation audio format does have the required instruments, and then they added the few repeated audio samples on top of that in the game engine There are no instruments "built into" the PlayStation. Games provide their own. The PlayStation sound chip is basically a 24-channel ADPCM playback with 512KB of sample ...


25

Neither. The level determines how fast the pieces drop. At level 9 a piece drops (assuming you don't press down) 1 row every 11 frames. So at the Gameboy's framerate of 59.73fps that means it drops at a speed of 1 row every 184ms. At level 10 it speeds up, dropping the piece every 10 frames. At level 20 it reaches a speed of 1 drop every 3 frames (50ms) and ...


20

Among other reasons: floors and ceilings of different heights would be very difficult due to the way Mode 7 is used to imitate a projective transformed plane. The effect works by setting the rotation, scale and offset of the tilemap on each scanline and these remain constant for the entire horizontal line. This can be used to render a single perfectly flat ...


16

I don't have knowledge of the Rush 3D engine itself, but I used to work for a company that made software graphics engines, so I can speak in general terms about how they're likely to work. The GBA has a low screen resolution (240x160) and a reasonably powerful CPU (16.8 MHz ARM7 core). This is easily sufficient to run a Doom-style game engine with no ...


15

Doom and other 'Apogee model' games work exactly how you describe. The game engine is there, as are almost all of the assets, but resources for episodes 2 and beyond aren't included. The executable itself will be different from the full game slightly, with ordering information in the menu and so on. To answer 'what was packaged?': Doom stores its data in WAD ...


14

(Links are to the pertinent points in the video) 00:15 Казахскся. ССР. A.D.2048 "Kazakh SSR A.D.2048" (Russian script, Latin date) 02:49 Сиби́рь 1 "Siberia" (Russian script) 06:24 געלראב "Balrog"2 (written backwards and mis-spelled3) (looks like some kind of Aramaic or Hebrew script; Hebrew shown above) 11:03 Amazon "...


11

It's a PSF (Portable Sound Format, see Wikipedia) music file, the PlayStation equivalent of the Amiga's module (.mod) format, where sound samples and replay data sequences are stored inside one file, so tracked music instead of streamed music.


10

There is nothing about the NES that enables Mario's more physics-based behaviour; credit is due to Miyamoto et al for that innovation. Algorithmically, all there really is to it is maintaining a fractional part of location and applying user input as an acceleration rather than directly as a velocity. So: 16-bit arithmetic rather than 8, two adds rather than ...


9

Firstly, on the "difficulty" of programming a teleport routine: Teleporting an NPC when it gets stuck is actually a relatively straight-forward task to achieve. Identifying when an NPC has gotten caught is simple: you can calculate the Euclidian distance between the NPC and the player, and if it exceeds some threshold X, then you conclude that the ...


7

The info files fore the downloads (can be downloaded separately) show that there are two different versions of the game (1.0 and 1.4) plus two revisions of each version (1.0 with an alternative disk 1 and 1.4 with disk 1 and two having differences) Not uncommon with old games that they released several versions and never told you about it. The 'revisions' ...


5

From the DECUS VMS Fortran source, the random routine RND() is as follows: FUNCTION RND(IHIGH) C IMPLICIT INTEGER(A-Z) INTEGER*2 TIME(4) EQUIVALENCE (TIME(2),SEED) REAL MTH$RANDOM DATA SEED/0/ IF (SEED.EQ.0) CALL SYS$GETTIM(TIME) RND=IFIX(MTH$RANDOM(SEED)*IHIGH) END According to David Deley's How Computers Generate Random ...


5

I believe many versions of Qix did a flood-fill on both sides of the line, then observed which one hit the Qix itself and "activated" the other one. There are flood-fill algorithms that are quite efficient for the relatively large, open, geometric areas that usually result from gameplay. A modern approach would probably use a path-based scanline-...


4

I cannot answer the question from a game design standpoint, and I suspect the real answer lies there. Hopefully someone will be able to preempt my answer here with that perspective. Or does it actually require some kind of "expensive" mathematical calculation which earlier (arcade) hardware simply didn't live up to? Such calculations are not ...


4

According to this website, https://segaretro.org/Tomb_Raider "The European Saturn version also have minor differences to level layouts (specifically some secret areas) because it was rushed to launch three months before the PlayStation version. This was fixed in the North American and Japanese versions." Maybe these differences are what you ...


4

There's actually two layers of activity going on here. First, for each scanline the machine can choose both which row of pixels to scan out, and where on the row to begin. This is the basis for drawing the scenery backdrop and the track. I believe the SNES has specific facilities for doing this which are much more convenient than on the 6845-family CRTC or ...


2

Could it possibly be Rescue - The Embassy Mission (Youtube link, cued up)? That's the retitled NES port of the Infogrames title Hostages; it plays as a series of minigames with spotlight avoidance being one of them.


2

I don't know how the algorithm works, but I can describe an algorithm which is consistent with the behavior I've observed. The marker moves multiple pixels at a time. This means that rows and columns can be divided into those that the marker can occupy and those which it cannot. Software need only concern itself with pixels that are on columns the marker ...


1

Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka talk about it in this interesting video about designing the game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRGRJRUWafY At 4:07 they start talking about the game physics. The idea was to simulate Mario having weight, not just dots moving in whichever direction you push the controller. "Because it's an image drawn on a flat, 2d ...


1

I can't say, I didn't write it, and I haven't seen the game in some time. But the fill is pretty simple as I recall. Remember, that the boundary that is drawn does not have to be square, or a straight line, or anything. You press the button and leave the border, and then you can draw a shape of arbitrary complexity (you just can't cross over yourself, and, ...


1

Original Doom publisher id Software released a number of titles before Doom including Wolfenstein and Commander Keen. These were released as shareware which meant they were free to be copied and shared, but the shareware versions were not complete and only contained a limited number of levels. Because the internet was not yet widely used, these versions were ...


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