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1990? Are you sure it wasn't 1980? The game you describe sounds a lot more like those from the start of the 80s rather than the end. 😂 Regardless, according to the ever reliable Wiki, there were only 10 main random number generators around at the time: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_random_number_generators If we go back to 1980, that goes down to 5. ...


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I don't have knowledge of the Rush 3D engine itself, but I used to work for a company that made software graphics engines, so I can speak in general terms about how they're likely to work. The GBA has a low screen resolution (240x160) and a reasonably powerful CPU (16.8 MHz ARM7 core). This is easily sufficient to run a Doom-style game engine with no ...


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From the DECUS VMS Fortran source, the random routine RND() is as follows: FUNCTION RND(IHIGH) C IMPLICIT INTEGER(A-Z) INTEGER*2 TIME(4) EQUIVALENCE (TIME(2),SEED) REAL MTH$RANDOM DATA SEED/0/ IF (SEED.EQ.0) CALL SYS$GETTIM(TIME) RND=IFIX(MTH$RANDOM(SEED)*IHIGH) END According to David Deley's How Computers Generate Random ...


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suppose it's possible that the PlayStation audio format does have the required instruments, and then they added the few repeated audio samples on top of that in the game engine There are no instruments "built into" the PlayStation. Games provide their own. The PlayStation sound chip is basically a 24-channel ADPCM playback with 512KB of sample ...


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It's a PSF (Portable Sound Format, see Wikipedia) music file, the PlayStation equivalent of the Amiga's module (.mod) format, where sound samples and replay data sequences are stored inside one file, so tracked music instead of streamed music.


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