New answers tagged

-1

Floppy disks were extremely unreliable. As a consumer, if I knew a game would only be usable by booting from it's own floppy disk, I'd be immediately turned off on buying that game because I know that sooner or later, that floppy disk is going to be rubbed raw by the floppy drive's read heads and turned into rubbish. Then I'll be out of my money and without ...


11

Your question is backwards, the Amiga and Atari ST were really the only computers that had mainly bootable games on floppy, pretty much every other disk-based PC required you to boot into the OS first, then boot your game. There are a very small number of exceptions on the PC, but they are rare. The simple answer is that the Amiga and ST had part of their ...


2

Mendel Palace, GameFreak's first game, was written in family basic, so it is powerful enough to run a real-time puzzler. I read it in a book.


4

There were two primary reasons: Space - PC games were at an awkward juncture in time where both the OS and the games had grown but floppy disks had not, so there was often too little space on the disk to include the OS, even for single-disk games, let alone multi-disk games. License - They couldn’t just throw a copy of DOS on the disk; that would be piracy. ...


12

Games that were designed to be run from floppy were usually self-booting, and often could only be run by booting from floppy. In many cases, the game code could be stored in ways that would not be understood by MS-DOS (using things like non-standard sector sizes), and booting into a game would be faster than booting MS-DOS and then booting the game. The ...


20

The IBM PC was NOT a Game Machine Plenty of people played plenty of games on IBM & compatible computers. But the IBM PC was designed as a business machine, not a game machine. This is most obvious with audio capabilities. Where Atari 400/800, VIC-20, Commodore 64, Amiga and many other machines of the era included some (for the time) serious sound ...


23

Well there were some PC booter titles (MobyGames lists 249), but most of these were quite early games, even before hard drives, XMS or EMS even existed. These were almost always self contained single floppy games, that could run on the very specific hardware that existed. All they used was BIOS for disk access. Also DOS was not the only operating system, so ...


5

I'd like to question the premise, here. I understand that games in such a scenario would have to include a minimalistic operating system, but I guess a carefully tuned Linux kernel along with drivers for all the popular graphics cards would be enough? Space is an issue, so it would be beneficial if it were possible to have the kernels separately, or else ...


82

Bootable game disks do exist for the IBM PC. Conflict in Vietnam is an example of such a game. As can be seen on page 8 of the manual, the game boots directly without loading DOS first. The main reason it wasn't common was for compatibility. A self booting game has to have its own drivers for all the hardware it wants to support. As PCs quickly diversified ...


6

The code for the decompression system has been decompiled and partially commented here. Essentially the compression used is a form of run-length encoding, with a few modifications to make it more efficient for Gameboy graphics. The main improvement is that graphics are split into bitplanes rather than being compressed as single bitmaps. That is, each pixel ...


6

According to the Iwata Asks for G/S, Iwata created compression tools for the graphics in G/S (as well as other parts of other Pokémon games). Morimoto: What's more, there were the tools for compressing the Pokémon graphic code… Iwata: Ah yes, the compression tools. Morimoto: You were kind enough to create those tools. Iwata: Yes. (...


5

It’s easier to extract data from old games now than it was at the time, because the tools available now are better in general. Before embarking on this, it’s always worth poking around Jason Scott’s CD archives since there might well be an unpacker for your game already. Two tools I particularly like are QuickBMS — a scriptable file extractor, with support ...


0

Broadly speaking, you just need a way to get your code into RAM. The z80 begins code execution at the bottom of RAM. On a normal Spectrum, this is where the ROM code is, which brings up the BASIC interpreter and what passes for an operating system. From here, an autorunning BASIC program is used to populate the memory, usually from tape, but it doesn't ...


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