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128

Basically, because it is running under Windows 3 at that point. Windows 98’s setup process goes through three main phases, in three different operating environments; each one installs the operating environment for the next, until the installation is complete. The first, which can run from the setup floppies and/or CD-ROM, uses a DOS program (DOSSETUP.BIN) ...


62

In addition to Stephen Kitt's answer, you can go back even further from Windows 3.1 to the Apple II version of America Online, circa 1989. Certainly not as popular or long-lived as the MS-DOS and Windows versions, but it did exist for the 8-bit platform! While some things were done in graphics mode, most of the text and "productivity stuff" was ...


60

AOL provided (and still provide) their own client, which — at least back then — was called “America Online”. This was available on a variety of platforms, including DOS: (based on GeoWorks) and Windows 3:


43

Note, Linux is only a kernel, like msdos.sys in DOS or krnl386.exe in Windows. No. It had no GUI, it was purely command line. In Linus' initial statement, roughly with the release of the Linux kernel 0.0.1, we said, he ported bash and gcc to it. He ported probably also the most important GNU tools (make and fileutils (today part of coreutils)). I'm ...


19

Prodigy used NAPLPS (North American Presentation Level Protocol Syntax) to encode its graphical displays. This is a vector-based graphics originally intended for videotex and teletext services (in North America). Client-side behaviour was implemented using proprietary programming languages. Prodigy clients were available on at least DOS, Windows 3, and ...


14

On the Alto, the buttons’ functions vary with the program currently being used and the location of the cursor. The Users’ Handbook describes the functions in the default applications, using colours for the buttons: red for the left button (or top button), yellow for the middle button, blue for the right button (or bottom button). In Bravo, the text document ...


9

R.J. Mical, the primary author of the Intuition GUI built into the Amiga OS firmware, is most likely responsible for the concept, but certainly responsible for the detailed design and coding. The functionality with screens that really set the Amiga apart from lesser systems of the time (MacOS Switcher, DOS TSR's) was that the screen was the main UI primitive ...


7

I remember there being a folder installed with VisualBasic 4 or 5 that was full of those icons... I remember there being all the stock new, open, save, print, cut, copy, paste, etc. and some more esoteric ones like flags and smileys and chain links... I don't have access to my old MSDN disk from back then (they are in storage) but if you can dig up a copy ...


6

I suspect this is going to degenerate into an argument about what words mean, but back in 1965 the IBM 2250 graphics terminal had the equivalent of a mouse (actually a light pen) and a keypad with 32 clickable buttons that could be programmed to do anything (and have their functionality redefined depending on the context of what was being displayed on the ...


5

I checked on Windows 98, and the behaviour I saw didn’t match your description (or my earlier answer). Basically, whether you hold down the mouse button or not, menus stay open as long as you don’t click elsewhere or hit a key. Sub-menus open either immediately when you click on their parent menu entry, or after a short delay if the mouse pointer hovers ...


5

I haven't double-checked, but here's my understanding of how it works. The first half of the installer is a DOS application, with all the limitations therein and then, once it's installed a base Windows system, it boots into Windows to complete the process. The DOS portion doesn't have access to Windows video drivers, so, judging by the color scheme and ...


4

AOL was based on Quantum Link, which ran on Commodore 64s and which in turn was based on PlayNet software. By 90s, it was expanded to include The Remote Automated Information Manager or RAINMAN, which was basically an in-house developed state-machine/scripting language used to create every window you could see after you've logged in, from the Welcome screen ...


4

There's an address in the I/O page that when read, reads the switches. The same address may correspond to a write-only display register on some processors; i.e., reading gets the switches, writing sets the display register. I think that only the 11/45 and 11/70, and variants thereof, permit writes. Even then, whether the display register is actually shown ...


3

One candidate is the form widget in the Project Athena Xaw library. I couldn't find an exact date for this library; Project Athena started in 1983. And it's really a for graphical UI, not a text-based one like dBase.


2

nobody provided the option of independent screens This was common on the Atari 8-bit machines, who's designers went on to make the Amiga and included many of the features from the original designs. In this case, one could change the base address of the screen buffer by setting a bit in the display list and then putting the 16-bit address in the following ...


2

Icons within .exe files are stored in specific resource sections within these files. Any modern (or less modern) icon editor should be able to extract icons directly from the .exe or common .dll file, on a modern PC, I would use "Real World", on a historic environment, iconedit.exe should be able to extract such icons.


1

who came up with the idea of multiple screens as a OS feature? This feature was likely present in earlier mainframe systems (no time now to figure that out). It existed in the microcomputer world in 1983 with Concurrent CP/M-86


1

As far I recall, most of those icons were saved in standard dll files. Most probably SYSTEM32.DLL and PIFMGR.DLL


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