16

Old games like these don't have much that can go wrong with them just from powering them up. The biggest problem with old electronics in general is that any electrolytic capacitors will dry out in storage, then explode when re-powered. However, electrolytics are usually only used for power-handling circuitry, and your games had external power supplies, so ...


6

Given that the clock part in the Электроника ИМ series, according to the wiki page, was not modified to support the customary in the USSR 24-hour mode, it is likely that there was no electronic design whatsoever, and the only thing that was designed anew were the new game scenarios and the new LCD panels that could be supported by the existing underlying ...


4

As already answered by Mark, your first checks should be the PSU. To add another note: If the device hasn't been used for a while, you may find dust or minor corrosion has got into the case which will mean the buttons and joysticks will be temperamental. Given that you've had them well protected, this too should be a minor issue. It will not cause ...


2

The Wayback Machine later redirects cdpubs.com to slorevo.com (SLO Revo, Inc.), and a Google search connects that company with a Steve Mann.


2

This answer is not quite about retrocomputing, but anyway... They are making them, though it is a bit of a niche market. One of the newer ones (designed by the original Psion designer!) is the Gemini PDA, running Android (and some rudimentary Linux support), trying to spiritually continue the Psion experience (at least from their PR standpoint), and the ...


2

On the issue of qwerty keyboards on handhelds, I sympathise with you entirely (as the owner of a Nokia N900 and a Blackberry KeyOne). Looking at a modern smartphone as the nearest equivalent of a handheld PC, a physical keyboard competes with the screen for space on the front of the device. If one generalises that most people consume more media on their ...


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