36

I looked at trade periodicals from the time in question, because the intended customer for a hard drive in the early 1980's was almost certainly a business or school (look at the prices, particularly after they are adjusted for inflation!) PC Magazine only started operations in February of 1982, but there were already several hard drives announced or ...


33

Since the price seems to be an issue, I'll suggest a cheap alternative to hard drives. A IDE Compact Flash card reader with a 4GB or 8GB compact flash card is a cheap combo, still sold (less than 10 euros for the reader on Amazon), consumes not much power (which could be an issue with a hard drive) The capacity shouldn't be an issue either. For less that 50 ...


19

TL;DR: How much did the first hard drives for the IBM PC or Apple || cost, and how big were they? Ready to use setups started around 3,000+ USD for 5 MiB in 1981 Long (Hi-)Story As usual defining 'first' is hard, as of course some people always attached drives to their micros way before there wer standard offering - our own Bruce Abbott gives a great ...


17

I have not tried it, but according to the Wikipedia page on the Host Protected Area, one use case was to use large disks on systems whose BIOS could not cope with them. It would therefore seem to be a case of picking a likely-looking modern disk and doing a suitable hdparm -Np command on it from Linux to set a permanent HPA limit. For example, if you wanted ...


14

Yes, this is possible. The file utility can recognise many disk partition layouts and file systems. If you connect your drives to your Pentium III system, running a version of Linux, they should appear as /dev/sd? devices. To simplify further analysis, you should copy their contents to a file: sudo ddrescue /dev/sdX backup.img backup.map (replacing X as ...


10

QEMU is not at fault here. The discrepancy comes from the BIOS. When I create a disk image as described in the question, then attach it to a QEMU virtual machine and use the info qtree command in the monitor, this is the geometry I see reported: cyls = 248 (0xf8) heads = 16 (0x10) secs = 63 (0x3f) The same geometry is ...


9

Sectoring on disks predates floppies. It was in widespread use on hard disks by the time floppies came around. Also, I would note that everything from 1 byte/word granularity to track-sized sectors has been argued for (and sometimes used) over the years on both floppies and hard disks. Still, why did it settle largely on 512? First, it's just as neat as ...


8

Very briefly: The way harddisks are addressed changed over time. Originally, you'd specify cylinder/head/sector (CHS), then it switched to logical block addresses (LBA), and the commands for those went through various versions with an increasing number of bits. As you can read on Wikipedia, LBA first used 22 bits, then 28, then 48. So you need to distinguish ...


8

The RP06 maintenance manual says Emergency Retract. An emergency retract operation is used to remove the heads from the pack if the retract operation fails, or if there is a power or power supply failure. and 3.4.2.3 Emergency Retract Mode Only one positioning operation can occur in this mode, this being an emergency-retract operation. In the emergency-...


7

GNU Parted's flags are misleading. GNU Parted's "flags" are not accurate representations of how partition tables actually work. They are abstractions, that are mapped, with varying degrees of congruence, onto the actual partition table mechanisms. The MBR-style (a.k.a. "DOS") partitioning scheme originally had an 8-bit type code and 8 ...


6

Disclaimer: I don't recall the exact prices and dates, so it's only rough estimates. For my Z80 CP/M system, around 1984 I bought a 20MB hard drive for 3000DM (~ US$ 1200 by that time). It had the 5.25" full height form factor and an ST506/412 interface. For interfacing with my machine, I used a SASI-to-ST506 controller plus an ECB-based SASI adapter. ...


5

what was the layout of the prime cost of early 8 and 5.25 inch hard drives? From Seagate and competing manufacturers? BOM Cost and retail margins (including relationships with dealer networks), R&D costs and financial burden ... While it may be interesting to those studying manufacturing economics in the 1980's, I don't think think that breaking down ...


5

That BIOS screen clearly says that it detects the drive as roughly 8 GB. The parameters say 16383/16/63 as so this BIOS cannot detect or provide the extended disk services that would allow the drive to be used beyond the 16383 cylinders, or the 8GB limit. It does not matter if another program can detect the size properly by communicating with the drive ...


4

According to https://www.philscomputerlab.com/windows-98-maximum-hard-drive-capacity.html Win 98 supports harddrives up to 127 GB so your 60 GB drive should work fine. But never buy a HDD second hand!


3

512 byte sector became the de facto standard because they were the size of sector used by the IBM PC. Prior to the PC's dominance, other sector sizes were also common - notably, CP/M (which was the most popular microcomputer operating system prior to the release of the IBM PC) used 256 byte sectors.


3

The first hard drive I ever saw for sale was at a Radio Shack around 1979 or 1980, as an add on to the TRS80. It was a 1.5 megabyte drive, priced at $1000. Chief advantage of it over a 180k floppy drive was higher speed and longevity. Floppy discs had a limited lifespan, and could easily be damaged in handling. In 1990, I bought a 500 meg SCSI drive for $1k, ...


2

I just found a great web page: Disk Drive Prices 1955+, which has one simple chart showing yearly, and in later years monthly, prices of drives. The page was made by John C. McCallum - more details about it on his home page. Most of the earlier examples are either IBM/DEC drives (not so easily attached to microcomputers) or floppy drives. One that is ...


1

For Windows 98; boot a linux distro and partition the disk giving Windows only the 32GByte. Then boot Win98 and install. It will work. The fact that there's more disk past the end of the partition only matters to fdisk (which will crash if you open it); but you don't run fdisk from your hard disk.


1

My experience has been that if you try to use a hard drive with a capacity beyond what the hardware will support you just get the capacity the hardware supports. The important thing is the size (3.5" or 2.5") and the interface (IDE aka PATA or SATA.) I strongly suspect you're dealing with a 2.5" IDE. Before you spend any money on it, though--...


1

By the time the first hard drives were becoming common at retail for early "clone" PCs, you could buy a 10 MB one for about $250 to $300 in the US. That was the actual price for a 10MB "disk-on-a-card" drive assembly consisting of a Western Digital drive attached to a controller ISA board. Of course, drives were much more expensive in the ...


1

In the early 1980's Lithgow Electronics [based in Greenock - not so far from "Spango Valley with its own railway station "IBM Halt] had the contract to assemble just 5,000 IBM PC's - single floppy drive. We assembled 50,000 that year ! Then we decided to get some for our own use: First addition was a 5mb TallGrass Winchester unit with a tape backup....


1

Are you limiting your question to "IBM PCs?" Because hard drives for hobbyists existed long before the IBM PC. I built my first computer, a Heathkit H-89, from a kit. It included 4kB of RAM! I designed and built 64kB of RAM for it, which I built on perf board with wire-wrap wire. I had a pair of ONE MEGABYTE 8" hard drives that I bought for it!...


1

Yep, I was a service manager for one of the first Apple stores (before Apple screwed us and sold through Sears...) The Apple Profile came in 5MB and 10MB and were very slow and prone to failure if moved. Our service contracts had to specify that we would move the profiles as customers were just unplugging them and moving them while the platters were still ...


1

CF should work. I guess this may help you: Connect the CF to your computer, no BIOS settings needed. Boot from floppy to the DOS Use utilities like WhatIDE or IDEInfo. They tell you how the system "see" the CF card (if so) You can find more details here or here.


1

Modern hard drives tend to list a CHS geometry of some large number of cylinders, 16 heads, 63 sectors. I'm reading the label on an 18GB IBM Travelstar for that; as CHS only goes up to about 8GB, the listed settings wouldn't cover the entire capacity of the drive. I think it's better to have the correct number of heads and sectors. It may then be possible ...


1

Did you try partitioning and formatting it on the Amiga instead, and then loading it into WinUAE? That would create the correct Amiga RDB instead a DOS MBR bootblock.


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