New answers tagged

72

A number of components still present in Firefox date back to the first code drop in 1998 and were probably present before that. One of these is nsprpub, the NetScape Portable Runtime library, and it has some code snippets which are still identical to those in the first public CVS commit (as verifiable from the VCS archives). For example, ptthread.c’s ...


16

Firefox has seen a great deal of development over the last 22 years, both in maintaining the original code and in re-writing large portions. Currently, much of Firefox is being converted from C++ to modern Rust code. That said, there are certain core pieces to the browser that maintain code from the time it was open-sourced. A reasonable place to look is ...


3

Slightly bananas answer: MC68000. Okay, I know, it's not a graphics chip. But, you can take some inspiration from the Xerox Alto, which would presumably have been a somewhat familiar source of inspiration to somebody working in graphical workstations in 1980. Since the Alto didn't have access to a modern off the shelf RAMDAC for displaying the contents ...


4

How come there are C compilers not written by Bell Labs? ;-) As far as I am aware, there is no prohibition on producing your own implementation of a programming language based on the description of that programming language. You can't copy someone else's implementation without their permission. You don't need to reverse-engineer an implementation if ...


-1

Javascript became a standard known as EMCA Script, and Microsoft's implementation of it was JScript.


59

Yes, it’s true, as explained in Wikipedia’s entries for the Mozilla application suite and Firefox. More accurately, Firefox is a descendant of Netscape Navigator; most of Firefox has been rewritten in one way or another since the days of Navigator. Most of Netscape Navigator (or rather, Communicator) was released as open source in 1998; this was then ...


2

I know they sold one system to the Mitre Corporation, a big defense contractor; I believe it was for research into new computer architectures.


0

A DECtape labelled TS9 has been round in Richard Greenblatt's house. Given other labels found in the RG; FD 4/1/68 file, it's likely it would have a copy of PDP-6 ITS.


5

The AGC, at least, didn't employ any such indirection. Calls to subroutines in other banks were performed via the BANKCALL routine (TC BANKCALL followed by a CADR pseudo-instruction containing the target label). CADR encoded the destination bank and address directly. If a routine moves because previous content in the same bank got longer or shorter, all ...


-4

Anytime you have a machine with multiple microcontrollers, you will have multiple, independent ROMs. Factory automation systems for example contain dozens of microcontrollers linked together on a CANopen network, with predetermined Node IDs on the bus and Object IDs (addresses) on each node. If a node needs to communicate directly with another node, it needs ...


-3

Isn't that the basic usage of any modularization? As soon as there are multiple storages, they can be exchanged vor updates - For the Apple II, for example, it happened twice: Changing the Monitor-ROM with Autostart-ROM and/or Integer-BASIC-ROM(s) with APPLESOFT-ROMs. Beside that, most (large/early) Computers didn't have massive ROMs but only microcode. The ...


6

TL;DR; What was the DEC CR11 card reader 'compressed Hollerith code' for? It essentially allows to read arbitrary card data as distinct 8 bit values, as long they follow the 'Hollerith scheme' of decimal encoding marked up with zones. Long Read: Compressed Hollerith: 5 rows are delivered as-is, and the other 7 (rows 1 to 7) are delivered as a 3-bit ...


0

I transfered my Apple II floppies to my Atari TT using the super-serial card in the Apple. I wrote a little program that would load sectors with the RWTS routine and use the monitor to hexdump over PR#1. On the TT a small GFA Basic program would get the data from the serial port, convert the hexcodes to binary and write it in a file. A transfer at 9600 took ...


2

One option not mentioned yet, was that we did nothing and lived with the bug as it was.


1

In early nineties, after retirement of mainframe computers in Czechoslovakia, there were many powerfull drum printers left in our computing center. If someone is interrested how we managed to print files from IBM PC-XT on mainframe printers, look at http://www.vitsoft.info/ecprint.htm


15

While I suspect that per-packet billing for the Internet was rare, per-packet billing for internetworks (particularly private ones) was quite common in the 1980s and early 1990s. Most of these were long-haul X.25 services offered by companies such as Telenet and Tymnet in the United States and DATAPAC in Canada. Note that your connection to the local Point ...


13

No, this has nothing to do with any networks; the "INT" stands for "integrator." That panel and the adjacent one to the right are the interface to an integrator/memory module: Integrators in analogue computers are used to measure quantity over time, basically a sort of sum function. You can find more pictures of the modules on The Analog Computer Museum's ...


7

It's important to keep in mind that there are vastly different business models when it comes to networking. We can categorise them as peering (between providers) and endpoint (non network user). Between providers, it's all about the amount of data transferred, as this is in direct relation to resources used. Toward endpoint users, it's about finding an ...


7

The key, I think, is that what we think of today as "arithmetic instructions" were in the Analytical Engine broken down into parts. To add two numbers, the sequence is + // operation card: set mill for addition L 001 // variable card: load column 001 to first mill input L 002 // variable card: load column 002 to second mill input, // ...


7

This might be at least a partial answer, from a Teletype model 28 manual/brochure: In the early days of printing telegraphy, "stunts" was the term applied to nonprinting functions. These functions were actuated by function or "stunt" bars in the function assembly of printing telegraph equipment. https://www.smecc.org/teleprinters/28stuntbox001.pdf


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