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3

I heard "on the grapevine" that Sega, with their benchmarks, felt CLX2 outperformed the PC parts of that era. Although CLX2 'only' had peak texture & shading fill rate of 100Mp/s, it performed rasterisation and hidden surface removal at a peak rate 32x higher, i.e. 3.2Gp/s. Thus for 3D worlds where there is nearly always a reasonable amount of ...


2

National Semiconductor had the name Tri-State and introduced the first commercial devices. Texas Instruments and others adopted three-state logic into their product lines afterwards. There will be multiple search hits on Dale Mrazek who invented the logic family and National Semiconductor. NatSemi was always recognised due to the hold on Tri-State name. ...


5

I don't know how to prove a first commercial implementation, but the Texas Instruments System 74 Designer's Manual (copyright 1973) includes the 74125 and 74126 quad 3-state buffers. A Motorola TTL databook from 1971 doesn't include these circuits. Neither does a Signetics databook from 1972. (I found all these references linked from this project5474.org ...


11

On paper, based on the fill rate only, all the high-end graphics adapters available on PC in 1999 were at least as powerful as the Dreamcast’s PowerVR2: the CLX2 in the Dreamcast ran at 100MHz, with one operation/pixel/texture per clock, and memory bandwidth of 0.8GB/s; the PMX1 (PC-compatible PowerVR2) ran at 125MHz, again with one operation per clock, and ...


1

Writing games those days was a long process, full of write - save - compile - run - crash - load - edit cycles. It was very frustrating, especially in the case you had only the tape recorder. Microdrives or floppy shorts the save / load time to minimum... So basically: yes, you can develop the game on the ZX Spectrum itself. The assembler itself takes some ...


10

The earlier 704 also had a decrement part in the instruction, and the 7090 can emulate the 704, so one should look at the smaller instruction set of the 704 for reasons for this design decision. As the IBM 704 manual states on page 12, there are 5 "Type A" instructions which contain both a a decrement and an address field, namely TIX, TNX, TXH, TXL, TXI (...


12

Funny that this post still doesn't have the right answer. The Commodore 128 of course!


51

DOS/360 (As distinct from TOS/360, the tape OS) Announced at the end of 1964 per Wikipedia.


4

Did any 360-compatible machine ever actually implement its registers with magnetic cores? Yes, of course, in fact, it was standard for low end machines. Beside IBM, as Ross Ridge details, many early compatible manufacturers did so. Examples are Sperry's Univac 9000 series, RCA's low end Spectra 70 models 15 and 25, or Siemens 4004/15.


11

Yes, for the IBM 360/30 at least the 16 32-bit registers (and 4 64-bit floating-point registers) were stored in the same core memory as the main memory. The IBM 360/30 used the IBM 2030 Processing Unit as it's CPU, and the IBM 2030 Processing Unit Field Theory of Operation manual states on the page 1-4 that "The sixteen general registers and the four ...


2

[Preface: The question misses to restrict it to electronic computer equipment, as I assume that#s what you're after. 80 column punch cards were already a thing before and there was much competition] Well, the story of compatilbe punch card equipment predates mainframes by far. In fact, The 80 column rectangular hole punch card was in part developed to shake ...


14

RFC565 identifies NIC 8208 as: Computer Corporation of America, Datacomputer Project Working Paper No. 3, Datalanguage, 29 Oct '71, 78 pp. A copy of this document is available in the online repository of the US DoD's Defense Technical Information Center in a pdf document titled "Semi-Annual Technical Report, March 1972". Working Paper No. 3 is bundled with ...


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