New answers tagged

2

I think your question must be put a bit differently for a first step towards an answer, like "was it common to use localized Unix applications from 70ies to nineties?" - In my opinion, the answer to that is already "no" (although improving towards the end of the period). The simple reason for that that most applications were specialized, ...


1

Is it historically correct to say that Unix programmers, liking to pretend that character strings and byte arrays were the same thing anyway, never really adopted wchar_t and in practice wide use was never made of wchar_t support? Yes and no. For one, Unicode did make quite an inroad for Unix in the 90s - and more often than not using a 16 bit type. But of ...


1

The Apollo Guidance Computer had some 16 bit registers while the memory word size was 15 bit. The accumulator used this extra bit for overflow detection. See here for a detailed description.


4

It is common for digital signal processors to have an accumulator which is wider than the memory bus, but may not necessarily be twice as wide. Although the only DSP I used had a 16-bit memory bus and a 32-bit accumulator that was twice as wide, I believe 40-bit accumulators are fairly common. It's common in a DSP to add together the products of many pairs ...


10

Intel Itanium, aka IA-64, has 82-bit floating point registers. These are intended to preserve accuracy in intermediate values, but storing them into memory without loosing that accuracy is expensive: they occupy 16 bytes of RAM. The x87 floating-point registers on ordinary x86 CPUs can handle 80-bit values, but those were intended for use with 80-bit ...


4

Partial answer. The ones I know that have Q and G refer to the same register are: PDP-6 TECO. See https://github.com/larsbrinkhoff/its-archives/blob/master/ailab/pdp6-memo-2.pdf and AI memo 81 linked in the question. There are two versions online, but only in binary form. Running on an emulator confirms G and Q refer to the same storage. ITS TECO. ...


7

After all this time, perhaps I should attempt to answer my own question. It appears to have been a feature of the IBM 700-series of scientific machines, as described in Buchholz's paper, and of course was replicated in their transistorized descendents, the 70xx. I haven't found any similar approach, so until contradicted here (which I actively invite), I'll ...


0

The MATE Desktop's default GUI text editor Pluma (which is a fork of GNOME Gedit so I assume this applies to both) still supports 'Mac OS Classic' 0x0D newlines on the Save As... dialog. Not an indicator of prevalence, but it's still available in a current text editor, so it's conceivable you could encounter it on a Linux-based classic Mac cross-compilation ...


-2

The CR LF (Carriage Return, Line Feed) is the (standard!) ASCII way to tell a printer to start at the beginning of a new line. Unix is a rascal, they used just LF (aka '\n') as line ending (when your memory is measured in KiB, each byte counts). Here Microsoft (and original Mac) went with the standard... Here on Fedora Linux I've got a pair of programs, ...


1

Terminals can process CR and LF a number of different ways, and the way systems stored text files was often a result of the kind of terminal to which they were most commonly attached. CR may either reset the cursor/carriage without advancing a line, or may both reset the cursor/carriage and advance a line. LF may advance a line without resetting the cursor/...


10

If your parser library is not designed to run on Classic Mac OS, there's no reason whatsoever to support a bare CR as a line ending. Modern macOS has only ever supported them insofar as some of its files might have originated on Classic Mac OS. Nobody uses them anymore and people who have got such files know that most of the tools they use will barf on them. ...


9

The pbpaste command used to generate CR line endings up until Mac OS 10.6, at least. With Mojave and Big Sur, however, it's long gone. MS Office on Mac used to be a dreadful emitter of CRs. It's now moved to CRLFs on CSV exports and text copied from Office apps and pasted using pbpaste. I have been unable to emit CRs on other modern Mac apps, so it's ...


6

Is the CR line ending still prevelant on new applications or should it be considered legacy? As usual it all depends on the environment your software is used in. If you're sure that all input will be [CR]LF delimited, then narrowing it down might work fine. If it's guaranteed that all data will be produced by Mac Software less than ~5 years old, chances may ...


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