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4

Or, more specifically, IBM/360 No. All labels were always global. The 360 assembler did not provide such relative labels (*1). But. On the other hand it provided procedural macro language (*2), which as well included the ability to generate symbols and thus labels in arbitrary manner. All needed to make them local is using a unique number - which quite ...


9

Yes, maybe, in a way. It depends on how you define “IBM assembly language”. If it must be officially produced and distributed by IBM, then this isn't an answer, but if the sole criterion is that it is an assembly language for an IBM computer, then the answer is definitely yes. The IBM 650 had an assembler called SOAP, for Symbolic Optimum Assembly Program. ...


4

The documentation, possibly including a language's keywords and their descriptions, could be copyrighted. This is why Zilog Z80 assembly language is not compatible with or a strict superset of Intel 8080 assembly language; because, IIRC, Intel registered a copyright.


4

The title of this question is now trivially answered. But what is the purpose of having LOC as well as ORG? To control location within generated binary fine independent from location assumed by the assembly code. Keep in mind, early tools leave a way finer controll than one is used today - after all, there wasn't much of a canon how it should work, so best ...


39

Specifically concerning EISPACK. what happened was that James Hardy "Jim" Wilkinson in the UK (whose career as an applied mathematician started with practical ballistic modelling in WWII, working with Turing and other computing pioneers, and continued for the rest of his life at the UK National Physical Laboratory, not in some academic ivory tower) ...


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