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4

This is kind of an extension to a [previous question] TL;DR: The 7030 addressing, works for many instructions, on bit level, not words. Next to all data structures, including bytes, could be located at any bit address. All addressing was always done using 24 bit. Byte is not a hard defined entity like today, but simply a name for a repeated bit-group (i.e. 1 ...


3

As per @Raffzahn's comment on his answer to Why did IBM 7030 or IBM 360 use byte and word addressing simultaneously, the 8 is an artefact of multi-byte instructions, where there was only 3 bits to specify the skip, making it trivial to have 1-8 bits. @NoNameQA I added more to the answer. No, 8 was simply what could be put in a 3 bit field offered by ...


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[Please see as well this answer, as it's kind of an extension] Why did IBM 7030 or IBM 360 use byte and word addressing simultaneously Not sure what's with /360 reference here, as it's uses byte addressing (*1). The 7030 in contrast used word and bit addressing. Word addressing of 18 bit when it was about words, and bit addressing in the form of a 24 bit ...


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'Byte' was used before it meant '8 bits' and It was used on machines that had word-addressable memory. The point was for the program to be able to read and write data of less than a word size. The PDP-10, with which I am familiar, had "load byte" and "deposit byte" instructions which could read any part of a word, sized from 0 to 36 bits....


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please check this website for an interface that is just under development... https://deskthority.net/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=23885&sid=2355e7e42a296f71abd0dea3ef8f3e21


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TL;DR: How true is this claim? It's true. While others used it before, it was the success of the /360 making it the default way around the industry. The long read: [Preface: I love the shown research] I was reading alt.folklore.computers today and found a claim: The IBM S/360 was one of the major computer systems that used 'A' to 'F' to represent a ...


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