61

The message was This program posts news to thousands of machines throughout the entire civilized world. Your message will cost the net hundreds if not thousands of dollars to send everywhere. Please be sure you know what you are doing. This message isn’t inherent to Usenet, it’s output by certain clients. It originated in rn, Larry Wall’s news ...


58

It's PL/I, promoted by IBM as the successor to FORTRAN, Algol 60, and COBOL. That's actual code as far as I recall, not pseudocode. PL/I had abbreviations for keywords; "DCL" is "DECLARE". It starts off by defining a procedure (routine) named P with one parameter, named MODE, which is a Boolean variable - BIT(1), then defines a bunch of 16-bit signed ...


45

Unreal Megademo, Future Crew, 1992 possibly? Certainly has all the elements you mention.


29

Since the computer was a gift from your aunt, working for IBM, the screen split in four reminds me immediately of the IBM PS/1’s “4-quadrant” interface: (The screenshot above is from IBMulator, an IBM PS/1 emulator.) The programs launched don’t match your description, but perhaps the defaults can be changed — at the very least, the lower-left quadrant ...


21

You can find it at https://files.scene.org/search/?q=unreal The file you want is /demos/groups/future_crew/demos/unreal11.zip - the latest version. There are many other fantastic demos worth checking out, available there as well! It is an official archive. If you like Unreal, then you'll love its sequel, Second Reality! You can also find recordings of ...


17

I think it's xa (xa65): ☑ #include "foobar" ☑ define the address to be assembled to via *=$1234 ☑ define labels without a colon ☑ Comments are marked with a leading ; ☑ specifying characters as constants such as in lda #'A' — the example given in the manual uses double quotes (lda #"A"): is that a disqualifier? ☒ .pet pseudo-op to include PETSCII-encoded ...


16

Here's a manual for CROS and one for the C500C robot controller. It seems clear that the bytecode files are compiled from the RAPL-3 programming language (no filename extension for binaries, .r3 for source files, .v3 for "variables files". There's a manual for the language here and for the development tools, which run on Windows, here. The manual for ...


16

IPSE = Integrated Project Support Environment (or Integrated Programming Support Environment ASPE = Ada Programming Support Environment FRIPSE = Formal Reasoning Integrated Programming Support Environment GRIPSE = Graphical Integrated Programming Support Environment Keep in mind, Dijkstra's rant is about the formal programming hype of the late ...


12

I believe you are thinking of The Print Shop I'm pretty sure I had a copy early on for one of my early PC's. Never did find much use for it, but it was available practically everywhere.


10

Managed to find it on YouTube thanks to "best of the demoscene" compilations. It's Sonnet by Threestate. If anyone is interested, here's a YouTube video: https://youtu.be/VauT4zzSz0g


8

There were a number of menu builders for DOS such as MenuWorks and PowerMenu. Here is a 1988 article that reviews some others.


7

What is the name of this file format, Well, it's called Intel-Hex-Format :)) Or are you asking about the file the link points to (tinybasic-2.0.hex) ? That's no file format. It's simply the recording of a (terminal) output (*1) while one has first dumped the symbol list followed by the the Intel-Hex file. and what modern tools can I use to convert it into ...


7

It was OfficeVision. From the link: "The IBM OfficeVision/2 LAN Series provides office functions to interconnected OS/2 Extended Edition and IBM DOS workstations on a local area network (LAN). Support is introduced in IBM OfficeVision/2 Release 1 for mail, correspondence processing, address book, file system and telephony. In addition to enhancing ...


7

IPSE stands for "Integrated Project Support Environment"; this was one of a series of names given to projects related to using theorm proving in software engineering. Wikipedia has a brief blurb on it, but this Chilton Computing page offers more detail and probably gives a better sense of what it is and what it does. FRIPSE and GRIPSE were related (FR ...


6

Was it Ulysses, Tennyson's poem from Illuminated books and manuscripts (pub. IBM Educational Systems, 1992)?


4

BEAST Behavioral Events Acquisition and analysis SysTem by Windward Technology BEAST grew out of a need for computerized event recording in Ethological research in Dr. George Losey's laboratory at the Dept. of Zoology and the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology at the University of Hawai'i. As it matured, more and more statistical analysis routines were ...


4

I did some looking around on the internet archive, browsing through a few collections, and I ran across this variant: Rhode Island Apple Group Volume 14 - Integer Basic Games The disk contains a what could be a variation, or an ancestor (or even a descendant) of the code listed above. There are enough similarities to look suspicious, but most of these ...


4

The program appears as "HELLO AUTO SELECT" in various public domain software collections that seem to derive from 1981 or earlier. This name appears in The Public Domain Exchange disk 166: "Hello and Menu" in The Best Apple Public Domain Software book from 1985, which states: The software in this book was compiled from user groups and individuals. It ...


3

Could be any of several. PrintMaster fits the bill. I think later versions of PrintShop had mouse support. PFS First Publisher had templates that may have included those style.


3

I think I know what software you're talking about. I picked up an IBM PC AT off of eBay about a year ago, and the hard drive worked perfectly fine. When I first booted the machine, I was greeted with a text-based menu software, looking like this (I took this photo long after I restored the computer): After a quick Google search of the company and software, ...


2

Could be Borland Reflex? Definitely had a GUI interface.


2

There are potentially many candidates for this question ("CP" for "Control Program" was used frequently in that era), so just to mention one: The Xerox Sigma 9 had two Operating systems with a name similar to CP/M: CP-R "Control Program for Real-Time", and CP-V "Control Program Five". The latter included timesharing (...


1

Simply use any text editor to remove everything but the HEX lines (started by a colon character ":"). This is how to get a pure HEX file. Colon has to be the very first character on each row, so remove the leading spaces too. Step 2 - use e.g. ASM80 Tools for HEX to BIN conversion to convert it to binary image.


1

(I'll leave the other answer there, because the linked system and OS may be interesting). If the "big box" was a desktop unit comparable in in size and form-factor to a DEC VT-50", then I would assume it was not a discrete multi-board CPU, but a single IC CPU. The only multi-user system similar to CP/M at this time I can think of is MP/M. As ...


1

DESQview By Source (WP:NFCC#4), Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47603601 DESQview was not a GUI - it was text-based window shell running on top of DOS and worked with "well behaved" text mode programmes. BBSs were a good example. Later versions could also switch between graphical apps but only in fullscreen mode. It could ...


1

I believe the first official TUI (Text User Interface) file manager for DOS was DOS Shell, first distributed as part of MS-DOS and PC DOS v4.0 (1988). Microsoft eventually dropped it from its distributions (though it would still function), probably as a small incentive to MS-DOS users to add an early version of Windows instead. I believe PC DOS kept it thru ...


1

There was also a program called NewsMaster that did these things:


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