134

I wrote a short python script that extracted the icons, matched them with entries from APPS.INF and generated an HTML file. Some entries were missing, so I entered them manually, except for the generic MS-DOS icons which I marked as "(no entry)". One icon was blank. You can find my moricons.py script on GitHub.


61

The message was This program posts news to thousands of machines throughout the entire civilized world. Your message will cost the net hundreds if not thousands of dollars to send everywhere. Please be sure you know what you are doing. This message isn’t inherent to Usenet, it’s output by certain clients. It originated in rn, Larry Wall’s news ...


58

It's PL/I, promoted by IBM as the successor to FORTRAN, Algol 60, and COBOL. That's actual code as far as I recall, not pseudocode. PL/I had abbreviations for keywords; "DCL" is "DECLARE". It starts off by defining a procedure (routine) named P with one parameter, named MODE, which is a Boolean variable - BIT(1), then defines a bunch of 16-bit signed ...


46

Unreal Megademo, Future Crew, 1992 possibly? Certainly has all the elements you mention.


41

This sounds like Interleaf (released as “TPS”, “Technical Publishing Software”, in 1985), a sophisticated document creation system produced by the company of the same name, based in Massachusetts. It was the first WYSIWYG document system, and typically ran on workstations, initially Sun and Apollo workstations. Over time it was made available on a large ...


40

You’ll find the mappings for these icons in SYSTEM\APPS.INF in Windows 3; this is the file which is used by Windows Setup to detect pre-existing DOS applications on the system, and set up icons for them in Program Manager. Look for “moricons.dll” and the index of the icon you’re interested in. For example the ADOS icon, index 101, corresponds to Access for ...


30

Since the computer was a gift from your aunt, working for IBM, the screen split in four reminds me immediately of the IBM PS/1’s “4-quadrant” interface: (The screenshot above is from IBMulator, an IBM PS/1 emulator.) The programs launched don’t match your description, but perhaps the defaults can be changed — at the very least, the lower-left quadrant ...


21

You can find it at https://files.scene.org/search/?q=unreal The file you want is /demos/groups/future_crew/demos/unreal11.zip - the latest version. There are many other fantastic demos worth checking out, available there as well! It is an official archive. If you like Unreal, then you'll love its sequel, Second Reality! You can also find recordings of ...


17

I think it's xa (xa65): ☑ #include "foobar" ☑ define the address to be assembled to via *=$1234 ☑ define labels without a colon ☑ Comments are marked with a leading ; ☑ specifying characters as constants such as in lda #'A' — the example given in the manual uses double quotes (lda #"A"): is that a disqualifier? ☒ .pet pseudo-op to include PETSCII-encoded ...


16

Here's a manual for CROS and one for the C500C robot controller. It seems clear that the bytecode files are compiled from the RAPL-3 programming language (no filename extension for binaries, .r3 for source files, .v3 for "variables files". There's a manual for the language here and for the development tools, which run on Windows, here. The manual for ...


16

IPSE = Integrated Project Support Environment (or Integrated Programming Support Environment ASPE = Ada Programming Support Environment FRIPSE = Formal Reasoning Integrated Programming Support Environment GRIPSE = Graphical Integrated Programming Support Environment Keep in mind, Dijkstra's rant is about the formal programming hype of the late ...


14

The description of space combat over a network also matches NetWars, which was bundled with Novell DOS and Personal Netware.


12

I believe you are thinking of The Print Shop I'm pretty sure I had a copy early on for one of my early PC's. Never did find much use for it, but it was available practically everywhere.


10

Managed to find it on YouTube thanks to "best of the demoscene" compilations. It's Sonnet by Threestate. If anyone is interested, here's a YouTube video: https://youtu.be/VauT4zzSz0g


10

Your image is of the menu of a DVD Video compilation authored in Nero Vision. As such it contains no information about the DVD player hardware. I've found multiple screenshots of this 'blue disc' theme associated with Nero Vision in DVD authoring tutorials. However, it's plausible that the same stock image ships with other authoring tools (legally or ...


8

There were a number of menu builders for DOS such as MenuWorks and PowerMenu. Here is a 1988 article that reviews some others.


7

It was OfficeVision. From the link: "The IBM OfficeVision/2 LAN Series provides office functions to interconnected OS/2 Extended Edition and IBM DOS workstations on a local area network (LAN). Support is introduced in IBM OfficeVision/2 Release 1 for mail, correspondence processing, address book, file system and telephony. In addition to enhancing ...


7

What is the name of this file format, Well, it's called Intel-Hex-Format :)) Or are you asking about the file the link points to (tinybasic-2.0.hex) ? That's no file format. It's simply the recording of a (terminal) output (*1) while one has first dumped the symbol list followed by the the Intel-Hex file. and what modern tools can I use to convert it into ...


7

IPSE stands for "Integrated Project Support Environment"; this was one of a series of names given to projects related to using theorm proving in software engineering. Wikipedia has a brief blurb on it, but this Chilton Computing page offers more detail and probably gives a better sense of what it is and what it does. FRIPSE and GRIPSE were related (FR ...


7

Was it perhaps DisplayWrite/36? From Wikipedia: Office/36 was a suite of applications marketed by IBM from 1983 to 2000 for the IBM System/36 family of midrange computers. [...] Components of Office/36 include: [...] DisplayWrite/36, a word processing program. DisplayWrite/36, in the same category as Microsoft Word, had online dictionaries and definition ...


6

Was it Ulysses, Tennyson's poem from Illuminated books and manuscripts (pub. IBM Educational Systems, 1992)?


6

Spaces is just the macOS name for virtual desktops, which are a very old idea. So they have indeed made it into the Mac world many times before Apple decided they should be an OS feature. That being said, the first appearance of Spaces-esque functionality was Switcher, by Andy Herzfeld of the original Macintosh team. That was first made available in 1985, ...


6

A few pretty-printers were published in the 13th Pascal Newsletter in 1978. The machine-readable text of a version of the one by Hueras and Ledgard is available on the SAILDART archive. (Also on SAILDART is an unrelated formatter named PFORM, although it might be fairly specific to the weird variety of PDP-10 Pascal used at Stanford.) The source code of a ...


6

The first gnu C compilers predate the ANSI C Standard, and unless invoked with the -pedantic flag would ease many restrictions which the authors viewed as, well pedantic. I don't remember for certain if the ability to treat ternary expressions as lvalues was among them, but I think it was, along with the ability to treat certain cast expressions as lvalues ...


6

You may be thinking of BookMaster (plus BookManager), which ran over top of SCRIPT/VS, which ran over top of ISIL/GML. (GML has, as descendants, SGML, HTML and XML.) As a program, it's pretty resource-light by today's standards (it requires 4MB of memory, minimum), but it was designed to work with reference-set-size publications as data.


4

BEAST Behavioral Events Acquisition and analysis SysTem by Windward Technology BEAST grew out of a need for computerized event recording in Ethological research in Dr. George Losey's laboratory at the Dept. of Zoology and the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology at the University of Hawai'i. As it matured, more and more statistical analysis routines were ...


4

I did some looking around on the internet archive, browsing through a few collections, and I ran across this variant: Rhode Island Apple Group Volume 14 - Integer Basic Games The disk contains a what could be a variation, or an ancestor (or even a descendant) of the code listed above. There are enough similarities to look suspicious, but most of these ...


4

The program appears as "HELLO AUTO SELECT" in various public domain software collections that seem to derive from 1981 or earlier. This name appears in The Public Domain Exchange disk 166: "Hello and Menu" in The Best Apple Public Domain Software book from 1985, which states: The software in this book was compiled from user groups and individuals. It ...


4

A partial answer that I nevertheless hope contributes: It doesn’t sound like an Acorn machine because the data isn’t in chunks, and probably isn’t an Amstrad because that uses the same physical encoding as the Spectrum so the lead-in tone for samples 3 & 4 would be the same as for 1 & 2. By ear, my best guess for Tape 4 is a Commodore but I couldn’t ...


3

I think I know what software you're talking about. I picked up an IBM PC AT off of eBay about a year ago, and the hard drive worked perfectly fine. When I first booted the machine, I was greeted with a text-based menu software, looking like this (I took this photo long after I restored the computer): After a quick Google search of the company and software, ...


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