27

The Amiga 9-pin joystick port is compatible with: Atari 800/VCS joysticks and paddles; Atari ST joysticks; Commodore Vic-20, C64, C64GS and C128 joysticks; Commodore Amiga computer joysticks and joypads; and Amiga CD32 joypads. This table from Wikipedia's page on the Atari Joystick Port showing the pin assignments of various systems using a 9-pin input ...


15

No, it can not be used to sample audio. As the link you provided says, in 12-bit mode it takes 10 milliseconds to convert a sample, and even in 8-bit mode it takes 4 milliseconds. That results into maximum sampling rate of 250 Hz, which is useless for sampling audio. The low sampling rate indicates the analog input is meant for slowly changing signals, like ...


8

As @user3840170 said, it looks like the mechanism is similar to the wheel mechanism in a mouse, which would make it a type of rotary encoder... basically a bigger, more robust version of the infinitely-rotatable volume and/or tuning knobs in modern car radios or the rotary encoders you can buy on eBay to use with an Arduino. (Though that'd have been my first ...


8

Many arcade games came in upright and cocktail versions, using the same PCB assembly for both versions. They usually had one dip-switch position on the circuit board to designate the cabinet type, while some had a software configuration menu where you could change the cabinet type, and some others (for example, I think Space Invaders) had a different ...


7

The PET keyboards did have something akin to scan codes. Electrically, the keys were arranged in a matrix of rows and columns, and scanning the keyboard involved selecting each row in sequence (via one of the PIA chips), then reading the column values to see which (if any) keys in that row were pressed. Since there were two keyboard layouts (the 'graphics' ...


6

It depends on what you call "compatible". On any DB9 joystick, the directions and at least 1 button will work If you're aiming 1 button joystick, then you can pick any controller you'll find a button that works. Now if you need 2 buttons, only sega controllers have a chance to work, but the buttons that work aren't the most naturally located. I ...


5

Here's a contemporary (ca. 2013) White Paper produced by the company. There was one US patent granted, which (US7706916B2) has "Status Expired - Fee Related" and another which (US20080252661A1) was abandoned. The inventor has other patents in his name, some unrelated to 3D mice and some assigned to Spaceball Technologies Inc. By far and away the ...


2

No it has not folded, been sued or bought out and it's still an active company, see https://abr.business.gov.au/ABN/View/32100627370. Though I don't think it's making Astroid 6000 anymore. There are no videos online because Spatial Freedom was founded well before online videos were a standard thing. So trying to find context like that isn't going to happen.


2

I'd say none, as there was no standard controller element to do so. Paddles allow only one value to be inputted (plus some button) but adding a spin would requite another value with multiple digits plus sign (direction). Of course and as usual, it's next to impossible that something didn't exist. The situation is of course different using other methods of ...


1

Its a pity the Astroid 6000 is no longer available, we still use a couple of them in our design office currently with Inventor 2019, these were purchased in 2008 and still work perfectly. Drivers were still available via spatialfreedom website, although couldnt access it today? These were also quarter of the price of the 3D Connexion items and cant knock the ...


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