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6

There was no need, because an appropriate protocol was created instead. Licklider Transmission Protocol (LTP) was explicitly designed to replace TCP/IP and UDP for long-distance networked communications in space. LTP was conceived in 2008, which was still some time before IPv4 address exhaustion and the more widespread adoption of IPv6. It also predated ...


4

DTN Not an answer about IPv6, per se, but apropos to "IP in space" is a recent Quanta interview with Vincent Cerf, where he mentions the development of Delay-Tolerant Networking, which uses "bundle protocols". It's packet-switched like IP, but allows nodes to store packets rather than dropping them, waiting for an opportune time to ...


13

No. One of the members of the committee designing ipv6, Andrew S Tanenbaum, wrote many about their decision processes and considerations in his book "Computer Networks". The for us important part is in the chapter 5.6.3: Interplanetary communication is not even mentioned. Not even indirectly. Nothing is mentioned what is a real problem of the ...


8

TL;DR: No, as IPv6 does not work that way. The Long Read While IPv6 does carry several changes and enhancements/simplifications of protocol handling, none of them are about latency. It's main feature is an increased address size to 128 bit. That's more than enough to give each possible planet in the visible universe a dedicated address range the size of the ...


24

The address space is only one (maybe the easiest to solve) problem you'd have when extending Internet protocols beyond earth, especially with a supposed pretty low number of projected extraterrestrial nodes for the foreseeable future. A much bigger problem is the end-to-end delay. With anticipated packet delays of several minutes, the concept of the ...


1

What would be the easiest way for me to have access to aminet? Serial. PC doesn't have rs232, so I guess null modem cable is out of question. With some USB/Serial it's easy back on. They are usually rather cheap ... and easy to hack, so some rewiring will make the nullmodem obsolete again :) Should I just buy one of these wifi dongles that connect to ...


1

As another example of how open things were "back in the day"... In January 1996 I registered a domain and set up a Linux box on dial-up with my local ISP just outside the greater Chicago area. Not only did I have static IP, but because of the way they were set up I received a whole 30-IP block of public addresses! The Linux box ran SMTPD, NNTPD, ...


14

Risk assessment is, of course, subjective, but I wouldn't worry too much if you're behind a firewall, or a router with NAT and no ports forwarded to this Mac. In that case, the only danger comes from actions originating at your machine, either done by you or the OS -- which is mostly software you download and run, websites you open, that sort of thing. And ...


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