24

As the question is unclear about what is to be considered a laptop and what screen size is sufficient, we will have multiple possible winners: (I will only include mass-market machines, as special solutions like terminals had LCD in various sizes quite a long time before) One-line portable computers have been around since the Sharp PC-1210 with its 24x1 ...


17

The 8080 is not a microcontroller, but a microprocessor, so it had no special provision for LCD displays, as modern microcontroller may have, except maybe for the ability to use packed BCD numbers. It had no in-built host peripherals that would support protocols like RS232 or SPI. You don't mention what kind of LCD display your college used, so this is only ...


15

Some laptops have built-in support for inverting the screen in one form or another; Toshiba laptops for instance have a setup menu to configure gray-scale translation and inversion, as well as a pop-up TSR and a command-line tool (VCHAD on VGA systems). If your system doesn’t have anything like this, I think your options are rather limited... As mentioned ...


8

I have seen this happen on several Nintendo systems: Back in the days of the G&W games, they were putting a rather thick polarizing layer in front of the LCD screen and not gluing it. At some point, they started to use thinner films and then glue them to the screen and, in some cases, the glue produces some gas and it can bubble. I am not sure why it ...


8

One strategy is to convert the digital to analog, then the analog to VGA. CGA consists of digital red, green, blue, and intensity (RGBI) 5V signals, plus horizontal (15.75 kHz) and vertical (59.92 Hz) sync. VGA consists of analog red, green and blue signals (0.7V peak to peak), plus horizontal (31.46875 kHz) and vertical (59.94 Hz) sync (RGBHV). The first ...


7

There’s a handy list of sync-on-green-capable (and known incapable) monitors maintained by the Linux for PlayStation 2 community. Any of the “tested working” screens should be OK; take a note of any caveats in the comments column. I used to have an Iiyama 450, which worked fine with sync-on-green systems on both its 15-pin and BNC connectors. Those are ...


7

You can invert the screen on a monochrome Omnibook by holding the Fn key and pressing either of the contrast up/down buttons next to the screen.


6

A passive, non multiplexed 7 segment LCD display doesn't need a real "protocol" - but neither can you just apply voltage to segments from some I/O pin. LCD displays at their core need an AC drive waveform, otherwise the LC material will be quickly damaged. Multiplexed displays tend to need more than two voltage levels per drive pin, and a more involved ...


6

Seems to me that the way to go would be to re-program the lookup table use by the digital to analog converter (DAC). The DAC is essentially the last component in the VGA, taking 8-bit VGA colors and deciding what each of those will represent. Thus, it affects the output from essentially all other programs, even those that write directly to the hardware. The ...


5

The easiest approach is probably to convert to a component video signal. If you pass the R, G, B, and I signals through a couple inverting buffers (so you have buffered versions of complemented and non-complemented signals) and formulated a composite sync signal, you could then use resistor dividers to generate Y, U, and V signals which could be fed into a ...


4

For programs which run within a DOS screen or window, you should be able to pre-load ANSI.SYS with CONFIG.SYS. You would then preset your desired foreground and background colors before running the program you wanted. The page ANSI Sequences seems to give pretty good guidance in using ANSI within a DOS window. I'm not sure whether ANSI.SYS still came ...


3

If you have a genuine CGA card, it should have a composite video output. I would recommend simply using that. For one, lots of devices still have a composite input, and the cables are very common. One thing that's often forgotten is that, for graphics, CGA composite video looks much better than CGA's notoriously horrible digital graphics. Games written ...


2

Your assumptions are reasonable, TN is most likely. DSM appears never to have been mainstream. TN LCDs provided better visual quality at lower power and took over pretty much as soon as they were on the market. STN's advantage over TN is in LCD matrices — that is, big arrays of pixels like a laptop screen where individual wires for each pixel would be ...


2

If all else fails, and you're up for (or know somebody who would be interested in) a fun low-level programming challenge, there's an interesting hack you could apply to this problem. This will work if: the software you want to run is traditional real-mode text-mode DOS software (i.e. doesn't use DPMI or similar), and you have a 386 or higher processor (...


2

In case you aim for a single box to convert digital RGB video to HDMI, there's boxes around like this that converts from SCART (which is RGB) to HDMI. I use one somilar to the one in the link to connect most of my old comuters (Sinclair Spectrum and QL) to a modern HDMI monitor. If your monitor has USB connectors, you can also conveniently power the ...


1

The MCE2VGA, based on Luis Antoniosi’s design, can convert CGA, EGA, MDA and Hercules signals to VGA: connect a TTL output to it, and it will produce a VGA-compatible signal. It can even emulate composite CGA! The first link includes video reviews so you can see it in action.


1

If you are driving a non-multiplexed LCD display, there will typically be one wire per segment, plus one common wire. The common wire needs to be driven alternately high and low, with the other wires being driven in phase with the common wires when they should be "off", and out of phase when they should be "on". A display with three digits and two decimal ...


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