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20

A solution like that already exists: it's called vamos (Virtual AMiga OS) and emulates a 68k CPU and a bunch of libraries - enough to get terminal only programs (like compilers and assemblers) running: https://github.com/cnvogelg/amitools Not all that easy to setup though.


11

Does anyone know hard or time consuming it would be to achieve this? Assuming you have a modern PC with VGA out, or you can put in a graphics card with VGA out, it's not hard at all, if you know a bit about how this works. You need to look up the horizontal and vertical sync frequencies that your monitor operates with (use the documentation, or google for ...


10

To my knowledge, no such driver has ever been written. Since the very earliest versions, Linux has been a pure 32-bit protected-mode kernel that drove most devices (including disk controllers) directly, without going through the BIOS. The kernel has never had any facility to invoke 16-bit code from kernel mode during normal operation (after early boot); even ...


9

Cheaper (free) licenses. Besides, they didn't need a full-blown graphic OS under them, so they could run on cheaper machines (less RAM and even without a graphics card).


8

Why does Linux operate like this? It seems to be a rather curious way in which Windows and Linux is different. As Faden already commented: "Because it tells an observer how long your password is" And to make at least the answer RetroComputing related, classic mainframe (block) terminals for example had an invisible or dark field type for secure ...


8

The Apple IIc monitor (A2M4043) mentioned in the question takes a composite video signal. Some older laptops and graphics cards output composite or S-Video either directly or through a breakout cable. Otherwise, an external graphics adapter that interfaces to the PC via USB and outputs VGA is about $10-15. Once you're working in the analog domain, you have a ...


8

Unless someone can come up with some actual market research from the 1990s ("we've asked n companies which web servers they chose, and why"), this will be opinion based, but: I'd venture that (a) Unices had a head start as internet servers, and that (b) Linux was the cheapest good-enough platform. Regarding (a), there were many internet services (...


8

The original Pentium, which succeeded the i80486, was indeed the original definition of the i586 instruction set - and not x86_64. But the Pentium was introduced in 1993, and your HP machine is much newer than that. Intel has continued to use the Pentium brand for almost every x86-compatible CPU line they've made since then, to great confusion among people ...


5

xroach (at least, this version, fixed for modern compilers) still works on current Linux distributions, as long as the desktop uses X and the root window is visible. Here it is running on Debian 10, with FVWM running the show: (the cockroaches are in the top-left of the screen). To reproduce this, regardless of your current desktop (assuming all four ...


5

VGA was a huge and very bold rejection of NTSC! TLDR of this whole history section: VGA and NTSC have nothing to do with each other. VGA was a blank-sheet design that smashed NTSC limitations with extreme prejudice - and planned to never, ever, ever go back. Apple IIc monitors, like most monitors of that age, use the NTSC composite video standard in all ...


4

Creating a composite signal for a monochrome monitor should be quite easy. I remember using 4 or 5 resistors to mix green, brightness, HSync and VSync from a 9-pin EGA output to construct a perfectly usable composite video signal. You will probably not find CGA or EGA adapter in 2020, but the standard 15-pin VGA looks almost as easy. The timing in VGA is ...


4

For completeness, I’ll mention DJLINK, an OMF linker written by DJ Delorie (who also created DJGPP). This is probably not the best option: it never seems to have left proof-of-concept stage, and compiling it on Linux with modern GCC requires a little patching (to add missing const qualifiers and header includes). Nevertheless, I managed to use it with some ...


4

As a tongue-in-cheek answer, I'd look at >uptime 09:40am up 97 days 23:23, 32 users..., BTW this was post a recent upgrade. Before that it'd been running for a couple of years.


3

"Shouldn't modern systems be able to load files consisting only of tens of kilobytes into memory in microseconds, not minutes?" You seem to be unclear as to what an emulator is. The whole point of an emulator is to emulate what the real hardware would do. If a C64 took 30 minutes to load a non-fastload game from tape, then the emulator taking 30 ...


3

It's perfectly possible for both userspace and the kernel to access the BIOS. In fact, the kernel offers a vm86 syscall, which is an emulation of real mode. This syscall was used for a long time in the vesa driver for X (before it got replaced with the vesafb kernel driver; see e.g. here for some code), there are projects like Linux Real-Mode Interface which ...


3

It's possible to make NASM create a woking DOS .exe file by defining and using a few macros. Example source file: %include "fullprog_dosexe.inc.nasm" fullprog_code mov ah, 9 ; WRITE_STDOUT. mov dx, msg int 0x21 ; http://spike.scu.edu.au/~barry/interrupts.html fullprog_data ; This is mandatory for .exe. msg: db 'Hello, World!', 13, 10, '$' ...


3

Raspberry Pi has composite video out built in. There's a QA here which has details relevant to configuration. One of those with the appropriate adapter/cable may be the easiest way to get that old-fashioned experience you're looking for.


1

There are some solutions you could try. You can search for a monochrome VGA (actually they are multisync monitors. Search on ebay for an IBM 4707 or an IBM 8503/8504 for that 90s look. While you are at it and are lucky you could find a complete PS/2 you could use as a terminal or even try to run an older version of Linux of it (Model 90 were 486 and pentiums,...


1

Gentoo is a source-based distribution, where everything is built from the source. You can tune GCC to build for i586 like this: COMMON_FLAGS="-march=i586 -mtune=pentium -O2 -pipe" in your /etc/portage/make.conf Changing -O2 to -Os will decrease executables size a bit. Another thing you need to worry is to build correct kernel. If the build process ...


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