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20

To volunteer a few: Acornsoft LISP. First released in 1982 on tape, disk and ROM chip for the BBC Micro and rereleased as a cartridge for the Acorn Electron in 1984; possibly related to the Apple II's Owl LISP. SpecLISP. Released in 1983 for the ZX Spectrum, a subset of Stanford LISP. It wasn't well-documented at the time, so is a little obscure. Includes ...


20

The first LISP compiler was implemented very early in the life of the first LISP, LISP I for the IBM 704. The LISP I Compiler From the LISP I Programmer's Manual (March 1, 1960) section 4.2, "Definitions of Functions in LISP" In Chapter 2 functions are connected to their names only through the use of the form LABEL. In the current LISP system, there ...


18

You are misinterpreting the nature of the Lisp stack. The 256 byte hardware stack of the 6502 processor was not used for the large stacks required by Threaded Interpreted Languages (TILs) like Lisp and Forth. As you say, 256 bytes is grossly inadequate for languages of this type. The nature of Lisp is to act upon lists of data. A function is merely data ...


15

Lisp is not a single language, but a whole ecosystem of different languages. Moreover, there's no standard covering all Lisps, like with C or Fortran, so for this reason, + and plus are equally "valid". When Lisp 1 (March 1960) was written, the primitive operations defined were car, cdr, cons, and, or, cond, etc. The arithmetic operations were not ...


10

From the MIT AI Lab file .INFO.; LISP ARCHIV for Maclisp updates: 3/1/69 JONL THE CURRENT VERSION OF LISP, "LISP 102", HAS THE FOLLOWING AS-YET UNDOCUMENTED FEATURES: 1)"DEFUN" IS AN FSUBR USED TO DEFINE FUNCTIONS. EXAMPLES ARE (DEFUN ONECONS (X) (CONS 1 X)) WHICH IS EQUIVALENT TO (DEFPROP ONECONS (LAMBDA (X) (CONS ...


7

For the PDP-1, a scanned and OCR'd (so you can cut & paste) listing of the LISP interpreter is available. This was actually the first LISP implementation, IIRC. The PDP-1 doesn't have any hardware stack; subroutine calls (jsp) store the return address in AC. So the LISP call stack ("push down list") is implemented in software, using the pointer pdl and ...


6

There was a variant of InterLisp for Atari 8-bit systems. There was Gnosis P-Lisp for Apple II, which was very simple. There were a number of Lisp implementations for Z-80 running CP/M. And, straddling the 8/16-bit divide, there was Golden Common Lisp for IBM PC, which ran on 8088 (and runs nicely on my HP 95LX as a result) but actually was a real Common ...


6

The following answer isn't strictly speaking a version of LISP. That's why I didn't add it to the community answer. ZIL, the Zork Implementational Language, was intended to allow interactive fiction games to run on desktops. ZIL was derived from MDL which, in turn, was derived from LISP. But ZIL wasn't really a full blown Lisp. Infocom's original ...


5

PDP-10 MACLISP (mid-80s version) Lars Brinkhoff runs a public ITS system on its.pdp10.se (telnet protocol on port 10003) which has MACLISP available, though it's a mid-1980s version. You can log in and use it as follows. Below, … indicates elided output text, ^Z is Ctrl-Z, and lines containing your input (sometimes preceeded by a prompt) are indicated with ...


4

PDP-6 LISP (around 1966) LISP 1.5 ported to the Project MAC / AI Lab PDP-6 in 1964. This version is estimated to be from around 1966 and is a binary machine code file found on a DECtape belonging to Peter Samson. Due to an incompatible PDP-6 instruction, it has been patched to run on a PDP-10. It can of course also be run unpatched on PDP-6 emulators, of ...


3

I think you first has to decide whether you want Maclisp, or LISP 1.5, or something else. We do have a copy of PDP-10 Maclisp running on ITS here: http://github.com/PDP-10/its But it's the latest version from the mid 1980s. There are older versions archived going back to the early 1970s, but they are not public (yet). There is also Multics Maclisp; ask ...


3

All the various LISP 1.5 systems (on the IBM 7090 and otherwise) appears always to have used only PLUS, DIFFERENCE, MINUS (unary), etc. (§4.2 p.25) Its small derivative PDP-1 LISP (1964) also did as well (§2 p.3 Table 1, though I don't know what happened to DIFFERENCE.) LISP 2, discussed extensively in the early '60s but never implemented, did use symbols ...


3

The defun macro is just syntactic sugar for define plus lambda. InterLisp (1970) doesn't seem to have it either, so your MacLisp example is either the first, or pretty close to being the first.


2

PDP-1 LISP Amongst the SIMH Software Kits is L. Peter Deutsch's PDP-1 LISP 1.5 implementation. It's quite limited (particularly in terms of memory) and also reads all numbers in octal, but does at least let you enter and evaluate basic expressions. On Linux, install SIMH from your distribution's package repositories, e.g., sudo apt-get install simh. ...


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