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8

I have this monitor, which I think is a Commodore 64 monitor. Not really. And especially not for the C64. The screen was manufactured in Taiwan (*1) for/by Philips. It was widely sold as a monochrome screen to many countries. What is true is, that Commodore OEMed it ca. 1985 as 1901(*2) or later 75BM13 (*3) for/with the PC10/20/... series (*4) of IBM ...


8

Unfortunately, Hercules plug, while being the same DE-9 plug/socket as "small" RS232, is completely electrically incompatible - other than using the same connector type, there is absolutely nothing in common between the two interfaces. You can damage the card, monitor or RS232 port/converter if you try connecting RS232 with the Hercules port. So, ...


7

The monitor shown is a Philips BM7523 which is a 12 inch amber monochrome MDA/Hercules display. The cable shown in your photo ends in a DE-9 plug which is standard for MDA, CGA, and EGA. (VGA uses a DE-15/HD-15 connector.) The service manual with specifications is here. First, you might be able to put your VGA adapter into a mode whose timings are ...


5

If you mean the original Hercules graphics card (picture further up), it had a video port and a parallel printer port. Neither can be connected to a RS-232 serial port in a sensible way. And even if you could, there's no way you can simulate a graphics card over an RS-232 connection: The graphics card can be only controlled via the ISA bus. If you want to ...


1

The Hercules / MDA plug is indeed the same physical as the RS-232 serial port (although 25 pin serial was also used) but the signals are very different. It's absurdly expensive to use this signal for anything these days as the only usage left is industrial but converters and even LCD monitors exist. At one time, MDA to VGA/DVI boxes existed and I found a ...


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