New answers tagged

42

No, it didn't. MS-DOS never bothered to zero out allocated memory, as there was no security reason to do so like there is in a multi-user operating system. It was up to the C runtime startup code to zero out the BSS segment. For example, from the Borland C++ 3.1 startup code: ; Reset uninitialized data area xor ax, ax ...


4

Some 16K computers can be upgraded very easily, because they were designed for it. The BBC Micro Model A is one such, though you're unlikely to encounter one in original configuration any more. An additional 16KB can be added to the main RAM bank using unpopulated spaces on the motherboard, and two 16KB "sideways" slots (using banking in the $8000-$BFFF ...


8

The Apollo Guidance Computer had fixed and erasable memory. The former (which is the focus of this question) contained instructions and constants, and was functionally equivalent to ROM. The latter was where data was stored, and was functionally equivalent to RAM. The response to parity errors in either memory was the same. The effect of a failed memory ...


4

There were several cards, in the mid 1980s, based on use of 64 KiB. Except that it was usually not to use full 64 Kib, but to get RAM at the right location some (game) program wanted it. For example this page shows three different boards of that time frame. The main issue with RAM in the VIC20 is less the amount of RAM, than that its use swaps around, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included