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13

IBM i is actually the name of an operating system rather than the hardware. So, it is the successor to OS/400 rather than AS/400. The current hardware is IBM Power Systems. These can also run Aix and Linux. There was also the name iSeries between AS/400 and i. Regardless of its name, RPG has been the dominant language though it has also changed a lot. ...


3

I was a student pilot in the late 60's and teletypes were used as terminals to the weather services. I would consider that an end user interactive system. As I remember, it was line command driven and the speeds were slow enough that there were lots of abbreviations used to cut down on the characters transmitted. This was confusing and could easily lead to ...


0

As Raffzahn had mentioned, there was no real "teletype era" Yes, teletypes were used, but not as end-user terminals - they were system consoles. So there were no business people doing order processing on them. The era of terminals did not come until time-shared OS became common (mid-1960s), and by 1970 there were CRT terminals around. Computer ...


4

First, Payroll is really apt for batch processing. It runs once a week or twice a month in general, and it tends to be all done at once on "payday". So each week the operators key in the time cards, then they process them, they run and audit the reports, then they cut the checks. Big, meaty processing tasks done in bulk, vs high density transaction ...


10

But in between those [Batch vs. Terminal], there was an era of 'interactivity, but not as we know it', when computers supported interactive work by teletype. Not really. To start with, these were complete different usage scenarios. Batch didn't turn into terminal use - or got replaced by it. Batch is like mass production on industrial scale. It still ...


5

A few pieces: Why does one so often hear of payroll, specifically, being an early application of such systems? It seems to me this is partly because the payroll of a big company involved a lot of repetitive calculation, but also because it's particularly amenable to that sort of processing: multiply hours worked by hourly wage, output pay due that worker ...


5

For a relatively late example which you could run today under an emulator, I would suggest dBase II, a database program for 8-bit microcomputers. As the Wikipedia article goes into, it was based on an earlier program for mainframe computers. The CP/M version worked with dumb terminals, and I bet at least some early users had printing terminals. This ...


12

Not a complete answer, but a bit of information from the manual (for several Novas including the 1200): The hardware multiply-divide option for the Nova is actually a peripheral device connected to the in-out bus, although it has no flags or interrupt capability. It contains A, B and C registers, which are loaded and read by the standard IO transfer ...


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