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454

This is because of a flaw in the way Windows 95 generates events, and the fact that many applications are event driven. Windows 95 applications often use asynchronous I/O, that is they ask for some file operation like a copy to be performed and then tell the OS that they can be put to sleep until that operation finishes. By sleeping they allow other ...


100

Yes, it's a real effect resulting in causing a measurable speed up and can be reproduced at will: Try opening a large file with Notepad on a contemporary machine. The window must not be full screen. When loaded, mark all text using the mouse (the keyboard works as well, it just needs more manual skill). While still holding the button down (and marking) move ...


37

It wasn't just Windows 95, but Windows 3.x as well, even though they work very differently. Other answers talk about pre-emptive multitasking, so let's first clarify this: Window 3.x was using cooperative multitasking where each app would release the cpu for the other apps to use it. Windows 95 uses pre-emptive multitasking where each app is allocated a ...


21

The reason is because of how WM_TIMER is limited to 15.6ms intervals by default. If you call SetTimer() with a 1ms interval it will still be called in 15.6ms intervals. WM_TIMER drives a lot of stuff in Win32 applications like network packet processing and such. Moving the mouse causes WM_TIMER events to fire more often on Win95. So some applications will ...


19

The pre-ADB Macintoshes use a simple quadrature-encoded mouse input, no formal serial protocol. Quadrature encoding is a simple, physical process, that lends itself to a convenient cheat if you're synthesising input. Picture a cog, with an optical sensor pointing through the grooves. If you observed the digital output of that sensor, you'd be able to tell ...


18

Raymond Chen from Microsoft has a great answer on his blog: One danger of the MsgWaitForMultipleObjects function is calling it when there are already messages waiting to be processed, because MsgWaitForMultipleObjects returns only when there is a new event in the queue. His blog is a great read!


16

Some of the most available adapters which allow to connect a "modern" mouse to an Amiga are: Real USB mouse and joystick: The Ryś MK II. This is a very flexible device which supports not only USB mice (including but not limited to PS/2 ones) but also digital and analog USB joysticks. It is even capable of outputting joystick signals compatible with the ...


15

One alternative to the trackpoint was a trackball, either below the screen (as in the Macintosh Portable), or next to the screen (as in the Compaq LTE Lite). When the trackball was next to the screen the mouse buttons were typically on the back (you would roll the ball with your thumb, and press the buttons on the back of the screen using index and middle ...


13

Is there a way to connect the 1983 Microsoft "Green-eyed" mouse to a modern PC or preferably Mac (running Windows on virtual machine)? That depends a lot on the type of green-eyed mouse and OS to use it with (or not). If it's a bus mouse (DB9 or mini-DIN connector (*1)): No - as that would need a way to plug in the controller card (*2), which was only ...


12

Graphics digitisers like this were not optical, they were magnetic. The tablet contained a grid of wires which encoded a small magnetic signal. You moved either a stylus or, as you say, a device with cross-hairs over the tablet. As you pressed a button on the stylus, it picked up the coordinates and fed them to the computer. The coordinates could be picked ...


12

I think you are referring to what was back then called a digitizer. I believe they were mainly for CAD, but maybe someone who has experience with one could explain how they were used. At first when I read your question I thought of the old optical mice (not opto-mechanical mice that had a mouse ball) that used a special mirrored mousepad with a grid. Sun ...


12

Arguably, this is a common bug in early software based on an event-processing loop rather than a Windows bug: if some DD-paths of the loop only process a single event, then every time when two events are generated simultaneously, only one is processed and the other gets stuck. Moving the mouse generates more incoming events and restarts the loop. "Mouse move"...


10

For the mouse ball, remove it and clean the rollers with some rubbing alcohol and a q-tip or if its really grungy, pick the crud off with your fingers first. The ball itself can usually just be wiped off with a dry cloth. As for the yellowing of the casing that's normally a problem with the casing discolouring due to flame retardants oxidizing the plastic. ...


9

On the Alto, the buttons’ functions vary with the program currently being used and the location of the cursor. The Users’ Handbook describes the functions in the default applications, using colours for the buttons: red for the left button (or top button), yellow for the middle button, blue for the right button (or bottom button). In Bravo, the text document ...


8

One uncommon pointing device was the J Mouse. Zenith had it on some of their laptops. I remember seeing a laptop with this back in the early 90's. Another uncommon pointing device was the mouse on the HP Omnibook 300. My work gave me an AST PowerExec laptop which had a trackball that clipped on the front edge. The ball was so small it constantly got gummed ...


8

The Ryś MKII adapter by Retro 7-bit allows connecting USB mice and joysticks/gamepads to the 9-pin Amiga port. It's a true USB device so it's not restricted to PS/2-compatible USB mice like other devices mentioned here. It's available from a number of Amiga specialist shops (there's a listing of resellers on the page linked above).


8

I want to find a way, using software, to interface my laptop and the PS/2 keyboard/mouse using the adapters I bought. Assuming you want to use the passive PS2-to-USB adapter you just bought to plug it into a USB port on your Windows 10 PC, then this will not work. The passive PS2-to-USB adapters require the keyboard or mouse to be multi-protocol: The ...


7

Unfortunately there were a few "revisions" of the mouse, and the pads on the mouse side were not always signed; the color coding isn't guaranteed to be repeatable either. If your mouse has the pins marked on board, you can use the pinout of this extension cord to match them. If there isn't, you'll have to match them "by hand". Cut the mouse cable a very ...


6

Here is a guide on how to convert an old Microsoft serial mouse to work in the Amiga's mouse/joystick ports. Maybe the guide can be adapted for modern optical mice. (In fact, here is a thread about someone who seems to be claiming to do just that.) And here is a serial mouse driver for Workbench, all it needs is a serial mouse and an ordinary 9-pin to 25-...


6

I can vouch for the USB mouse adapter. I have one myself along with this Microsoft mouse. It's 100% ST compatible, much more responsive than the official ST mouse and does away with the ball altogether (optical technology). Highly recommended. If you want to stick with your original ST mouse, you can accelerate it using XCONTROL along with the MACCEL module....


6

This is a common problem to retrocomputer mice. It is mainly due to the low dpi resolution of the sensors in the mouse. Each movement only translates to so many data points. Early mice like the one that would originally ship with STs are typically in the 75dpi range, later aftermarket ones usually top out at ~300dpi. You will see this same behaviour on ...


6

Trackballs in various shapes and designs - if there was a build in pointing device at all. Early laptops, from Grid and Sharp PC5000 to all the early Toshiba (T1000ff) didn't have any such device. If the OS and/or application did support one, the user was expeced to attatch an external mouse, trackball or pad (pen operated pads where already available before ...


5

what pointing devices were used by early laptop computers? None at all. Windows 1.0 dates from 1985 but Windows started to become really well established around the time of Windows 3 in 1990 Here is a laptop I bought in 1991 This came with drivers for Windows 3.0. I think Windows 3.0 was an optional extra, the default OS was MS-DOS 5.0.


5

With enough work, anything can be adapted. However, I’m unaware of any products that will implement an ADB host controller and act as an original Macintosh keyboard and mouse. Any such product will probably be comparable in price to just obtaining the correct keyboard and mouse for the Macintosh. As you guessed, the protocols are very different, the ...


5

The closest thing I have seen is bbraun's adapter which allows you to connect a PS/2 keyboard and mouse. You can't buy one as far as I am aware, though I believe he provides all the PCB design files and source code for you to make your own.


5

Some of the early digitizers were off-line machines. In the 1970s We used to have one made by DMAC (sorry, I can't find a picture on the internet). This was basically a stand-alone device the same size as a desk, with a glass top and the mechanism visible inside. The drawing to be digitized was taped to the glass. The operator used a device about the size ...


4

The best thing I ever found for cleaning mouse balls is denim. The texture seems to be perfect. New denim might be an issue due to the fuzzy fibres getting on the ball. Don't use anything sharp to clean the interior plastic rollers as the scratched plastic will collect dirt more quickly and extreme scratches could cause uneven rolling. Retr0brite will ...


3

Many soft-touch rubberized plastics break down quickly with age (especially parts that come into contact with skin oils) and become gooey or sticky. Unfortunately there's not much you can do to reverse the process. The rubber "mouse" nipple is usually just a friction fit piece that can be wiggled loose, but try to find the service manual for your laptop to ...


3

Another option is to replace the innards of the original Amiga mouse with a new laser PCB. There is this one sold by AMIGAstore.eu that supports most of the popular Amiga mice models. Doesn't solve the ergonomics, if that's really a problem, but makes the original-looking mouse just a little bit less infuriating to use.


2

No tools or fluids method, takes about a minute or two all total: Unscrew or unclick the retaining plate on the bottom, remove the ball, then find the two or three rollers. Scratch off the accretion on each roller with your sideways fingernail, (so the roller cannot turn more than a few degrees), turning as needed to get all 360 degrees. The lint-like ...


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