New answers tagged

7

Adding or removing some text has the effect that things coming later in the EXE file are now found at a different absolute location, machine code as well as the EXE file format rely a lot on absolute locations. So, it's important to keep the exact same byte length of the file. So, replacing characters is mostly safe (if you're sure that the bytes are really ...


13

If you change the lengths of strings in a binary, or indeed move any part of a binary around in any way, then you’re likely to break it: offsets to the data (and code) that the program expects to find are stored in the binary, and won’t be adjusted when you alter it. Thus changing text (or anything else, including code) while preserving the lengths is ...


-2

its called Banner Mania, run under dos :D https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banner_Mania


-1

This is not for a serial port - it uses an ethernet connection. If you have one, it will be a lot quicker than a serial port. In addition the the methods described by @Spektre, you could also use mswgcn if you can find it on the internet. It stands for MS Workgroup Connect - basically drivers for a wired ethernet link in DOS. The last time I tried this ...


2

For completeness, I’ll mention DJLINK, an OMF linker written by DJ Delorie (who also created DJGPP). This is probably not the best option: it never seems to have left proof-of-concept stage, and compiling it on Linux with modern GCC requires a little patching (to add missing const qualifiers and header includes). Nevertheless, I managed to use it with some ...


0

You have to keep in mind that early IBM-compatible PCs did not have "standard" hardware. The hard disk would be a good example: Today, most computers typically have SATA hard drives, so an operating system must support SATA to support hard disk access. In the 1980s there were controllers for hard disks with ST-506 interface, IDE hard disks and a ...


1

Standard PC hardware includes a real-time clock powered by a battery I guess this is a valid assumption since IBM PC AT. Older PCs (PC, PCjr, XT) has no RTC by default (due to Wikipedia).


8

It was necessary, because the early hardware did not contain a Real Time Clock (RTC) chip. The first IBM PC model to have an RTC chip as a standard feature and supported by BIOS was the IBM PC/AT, and earlier models could be retrofitted with an add-on RTC ISA card. So the models before AT cannot possibly know the current time automatically after powering the ...


0

I think the last Acrobat for DOS was version 1 Acrobat 1.0 for DOS https://winworldpc.com/download/48c5bdc3-ba6a-18c3-9a11-c3a4e284a2ef


3

You could try getting in touch with http://www.vintage-icl-computers.com/ I was browsing through their pages earlier and see they have loads of old software disks and a DRS PWS M80 that looks to be running MS-DOS 4.1 & Windows 1.03


57

Because it used to be necessary. While a battery-powered real-time clock is standard today, this wasn’t always the case. The very first IBM 5150 did not include an RTC chip. This meant that when the computer was turned off, there was no hardware inside to maintain the clock. A number of third-party extension boards were available to overcome this problem; ...


15

I discovered the answer on my own. Turns out PSVIEW requires GhostScript, PDFTOPS, and LXPIC to be installed on the hard drive in order to run. GhostScript must be placed in 'C:\gs'. PDFTOPS and LXPIC must be in a directory mentioned in the path environment variable set in 'AUTOEXEC.BAT'.


2

A long time ago there was an official release of Acroreader for DOS. I assume it would work with FreeDOS, but I don't know. I also don't know where you might find a copy, but if you search it is probably still out there.


2

Looks like Acrobat Reader 3.0 might be the latest version of Acrobat Reader that will work under Windows 3.11, which you can install in a DOS environment. If you have enough disk space, and are willing to replace FreeDOS with an actual MS-DOS 6.22 install, you can try installing Windows 3.x and use that to read PDFs when needed.


0

Scandisk appeared in msdos 6.20, to cure the problems that dblspace in 6.00 was doing to people's data. It's essentially a cutdown version of Norton Disk Doctor (NDD). When Windows 95 came around, they continued to use it for the next rolling experiment: fat-lfn. Nuts&Bolts included a competing product 'diskmind', as dmdos.exe and diskmind.exe. You ...


2

To make the various steps in Michael's answer explicit: To call indirectly to another segment, ES:BX needs to contain the address of xms_driver. DS is invalid after inline asm/pseudo-variable assigment, so xms_driver has to be inspected first. This is the result: void xms_move_xmb_internal(moveparams *params_ptr) { asm push es asm push ds ...


0

Disclaimer: I'm aware that this does not answer the question about a tool of that name. But chances are that no such tool was used... EDIT: I overlooked the comment that confirmed the tool, sorry. Anyway, this might help when no tool is available. I am using "doskey" for this since at least since cd knows the option /d, and its macro: cd=cd /d $* ...


-1

cdd and cdd! were quite common DOS utilities. eg search for cddbang or dos cdd cd /d does not work under straight MS/PC-DOS. Another frightfully useful utility is mcd, make and change directory. c:>mcd c:\windows\system c:\windows\system> Would make the directory and change to it in a single line.


1

Paul Houle wrote a version of doskey with autocompletion. I currently have it loaded under IBMDOS 5.00, but it works under other DOS versions as well. http://www.paulhoule.com/doskey/


7

void xms_move_xmb_internal(unsigned int ds, unsigned int si) { _AX = 0x0B00; _DS = ds; _SI = si; (*xms_driver.function_ptr)(); } looks like a bad idea. The compiler assumes DS to point to the global data segment of your program. In the large memory model, the stack segment can differ (I don't remember the default) from the data segment. ...


-2

This is actually quite possible, but getting Windows to run in enhanced mode is something tricky. I've been planning to experiment with PC-DOS 7.1, but the interesting thing is will windows 98 support dualboot on a fat32 partition, and can pc-dos 7.1 run windows. From people who run pcdos71, i'm told that build 1.19 is the go, with the 1.32 utilities, ...


-1

You can decompress IO.SYS by downloading the decompressor io8decomp at https://rloewelectronics.com/ It gives you something not decompressed, Windows ME also has himem.sys buried in the file. It's pretty early, but you can search for the device name in it. But the version from the boot cd has a different header.


1

On Atari ST/TT TL/DR 10 or 11 sectors instead of 9 81, 82 or even 83 tracks instead of 80 Remove second FAT and short directory (only 5 sectors). Detail On Atari ST, which had more or less the same floppy format than PC's, it was very common to format floppies with 10 sectors instead of 9 pro track. The floppies had a lot of slack for tolerance so that in ...


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