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Have you looked at https://hackaday.io/project/8473-msx-protocard? Based on all the information already provided, you may be able to expand the project and do a lot more with it. Check it out! Keep us posted. Twitter: @msxall


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The main TRS-80 line (Model I, III and 4) had several third party Z-80 accelerator boards. The Archbold board could bring the Model I up to 5.3 MHz from 1.77 MHz. The Holmes Sprinter boosted the Model I up to 5.32 MHz. It came in a Model III version to boost it from 2.027 MHz to 5.07 MHz. The Model 4 had several speedup board options. Incidentally, the ...


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For the Amstrad PCW, there was the Sprinter card - containing an 8MHz Z80 CPU that replaced the 4MHz original, a memory expansion, and cache RAM so that the processor wasn't restricted to the speed of motherboard memory. PCWs were largely used for word processing and DTP rather than gaming; in these applications it's useful to have more memory and a faster ...


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Yes, accelerators did exist - but they were usually niche products, or handled completely differently (see below). It's more of a market-driven issue than ability to speed up. Home computers never really had a big need for speed improvement. After all, any speed up would not only break games, but also be rather expensive, as the host system wasn't really ...


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I'm not familiar with the C64, and didn't do much with the Apple ][ back in the day, but I did spend a lot of time under the hood of my TRS-80. There wasn't a lot of room for plugin accelerators in the TRS-80 Model I. I did put in a CP/M daughtercard, which remapped system memory to get ROM out of the low address space, but didn't replace the processor. ...


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