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3

The story I have always heard (I will try to find and add sources later) is that in the wake of the 1983 video game crash, which primarily affected the US, Nintendo decided to re-evaluate their North American branding, and what they decided on was to avoid as far as possible any association with the console being a toy. Thus the NES is an "Entertainment ...


3

As said in the Raffzahn's answer, it's mostly a marketting or design choice and has no technicalities. First, you are mistaken in beliving all western NES cartridges were gray : They were some games released in gold cartridges as well. But you're right in that it's still much less varied than the famicom which featured countless different colours. In the ...


4

There is most definitely no technical reason. And since some NES games featured different colours than just grey (think Zelda), it can't be based on some licensing directive either. Once the forms for the enclosure are made, there is no substantial cost in choosing any specific colour. Japanese games do show this quite nice. So there can't be no financial ...


1

If you want to get proficient with the first option, that is disassembling a ROM and finding out which part does what, you should get used to an interactive analysis tool that responds immediately to adding label names, retyping data, declaring something as code and shows proper cross-referencing. The two best-known freely available tools that include 6502 ...


1

The reverse engineering Robotron 2084 for the Apple II topic on forum.6502.org discusses, through several dozen posts over a few months, forum user fschuhi's reverse-engineering of the Robotron: 2084 game on the Apple II. He did this using execution tracing of with Apple II emulator (written in Python), what appears to be a homebrew disassembler, xlwings ...


1

In addition to the above explanations re: sprites actually only having 8 bits of position resolution, the first column blanking option etc, the NES - and others following its same general design - actually had another, simpler, more physical tactic to address the problem: Overscan. The pixel generator clock, derived from the NTSC colourburst crystal by some ...


5

Pretty much every piece of electronics that's sold in the US, and may potentially be powered off the AC mains, has a label like that on it somewhere. It is basically a legal requirement... no certification, not legal to plug in and use outside of some very limited circumstances. And I think it's actually harder / more complicated to get certified for home ...


22

Any electronic equipment using radio frequencies which is sold in the USA has to be tested to show that it doesn't cause interference to other equipment, and also that it doesn't fail in a dangerous manner if it is subjected to interference from other devices. "Interference" could be anything from messing up the display on your own TV, through disrupting ...


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