33

Since the price seems to be an issue, I'll suggest a cheap alternative to hard drives. A IDE Compact Flash card reader with a 4GB or 8GB compact flash card is a cheap combo, still sold (less than 10 euros for the reader on Amazon), consumes not much power (which could be an issue with a hard drive) The capacity shouldn't be an issue either. For less that 50 ...


23

As cbmeeks said, you're much better off with a FPGA or CPLD. It's going to be nearly impossible to emulate an NES ROM with a microcontroller. A Raspberry Pi would be fast enough, but not with an operating system. It's possible to run code directly on a Raspberry Pi without an OS, like a microcontroller. You don't even need to worry about cycle timing to ...


21

Some issues you may encounter are: Motherboard size. An AT motherboard is 13 inches from front to back, while the ATX standard mandates 9.6 inches. If a case takes an Extended ATX motherboard it should take an AT one. Mounting pillars / holes. On an AT motherboard the position of the holes is not precisely defined by the standard, whereas ATX is more ...


18

Some of the most available adapters which allow to connect a "modern" mouse to an Amiga are: Real USB mouse and joystick: The Ryś MK II. This is a very flexible device which supports not only USB mice (including but not limited to PS/2 ones) but also digital and analog USB joysticks. It is even capable of outputting joystick signals compatible ...


17

I have not tried it, but according to the Wikipedia page on the Host Protected Area, one use case was to use large disks on systems whose BIOS could not cope with them. It would therefore seem to be a case of picking a likely-looking modern disk and doing a suitable hdparm -Np command on it from Linux to set a permanent HPA limit. For example, if you wanted ...


15

The short version of this answer boils down to something pretty simple and easy: Cheap, easy: try more different keyboards with your passive PS/2↔USB pin adapter OR Not cheap, still easy: buy a really expensive, nice keyboard that also works over PS/2 and take it as an excuse to get yourself a nice keyboard for day-to-day computing! The passive PS/2↔USB ...


13

I doubt you're going to be able to pull that off with a micro-controller. Maybe one of the 200-300 MHz versions...maybe....but unless you try a Teensy 3.6, you may also have to design your own board for the mcu too. Anyway, the problem is that you can't compare MHz to MHz like that. Just because the NES ran a 1.79 MHz and MCU "A" runs at 200 MHz doesn't ...


13

Not at all. Well, at least not with any simple plug / converter. USB works completely differently from PS/2; any converter will need an active component. And no, those pesky PS/2-USB plugs that were given away with many keyboards during the 2000s are not active, but just rearrange wires - the keyboard controllers themselves were able to handle either ...


12

Maybe the most difficult task is to find a plug for the Apple AudioVision connector. Here is its pinout, taken from http://pinouts.ru/Video/audiovision_pinout.shtml , in case you find a suitable connector and want to do the wiring by yourself. 1 Analog audio ground 2 Audio input shield 3 Left channel audio input 4 Right channel audio input 5 Left ...


12

I want to find a way, using software, to interface my laptop and the PS/2 keyboard/mouse using the adapters I bought. Assuming you want to use the passive PS2-to-USB adapter you just bought to plug it into a USB port on your Windows 10 PC, then this will not work. The passive PS2-to-USB adapters require the keyboard or mouse to be multi-protocol: The ...


11

Bus: yes should negotiate. Device size: possibly okay. If your OS can issue (and your scsi controller supports) a read(16), then you'll get the full capacity. If it only supports read(10), then it'll look like a 2TB volume (assuming the drive is bigger!). I've heard of some random old controllers that didn't support read(16) and caused problems for big ...


10

Your stated requirements are for hard real-time read/write access to all the pins. But for homebrew development, all you really need is to be able to interactively read from and write to ROM and RAM and the CPU registers. There's a flash cart called the EverDrive N8 which lets you add a USB port for debugging. But I don't think the debugging software exists ...


9

The Ryś MKII adapter by Retro 7-bit allows connecting USB mice and joysticks/gamepads to the 9-pin Amiga port. It's a true USB device so it's not restricted to PS/2-compatible USB mice like other devices mentioned here. It's available from a number of Amiga specialist shops (there's a listing of resellers on the page linked above).


8

Some popular expansion pack features: Programming languages (e.g. BASIC, D-DOS) File managers Office suites (e.g. View, Inter-Chart, Wordwise Plus) Hardware drivers (e.g. Epson Printmaster) Development Utilities Emulators Modems (e.g. Master Modem) Further reading: Chris' Acorns: BBC and Master ROMs


8

The spec you posted says the TV has composite in (i.e., your yellow connector from the Nintendo). The manual at that web site shows composite video going to the leftmost phono socket, labelled Video/Y. That is, one socket does double-duty for component and composite. The relevant part of the diagram is here. As to whether it'll work with your Nintendo, ...


7

ADB keyboards and mice are readily available on eBay for as little as $10. Apple used ADB from 1987-1999 for Macs and the Apple IIgs so there are a lot of devices around. The monitor adapter from Apple AudioVision to VGA is harder to get and I defer to @mcleod_ideafix.


7

Almost all SCSI devices are either 8-bit wide and have a 50-pin connector with single-ended (open collector, no differential drive) electrical signals, or are 16-bit wide, using LVD differential signalling AND having a fallback capability to work with single-ended drives if the wiring harness connects the right sense pins. There are 68-pin data connectors (...


7

For a while, many PC cases were made to be both AT and ATX compatible. This would have been in the mid-1990s, during the changeover from Socket 7 to Slot 1 (Pentium II) and Super Socket 7 (AMD K6 series) when motherboards were made in both shapes. You could try looking for cases from that period, or from the early 2000s. AT motherboards (in practice, ...


6

You are asking how to convert the analog video output from a console for using it on a modern HDTV system. The usual answer is to use some kind of converter from the best video output option available in the console, to the best video input available in the TV. Chances are that your TV already has the right kind of input. In this case, you won't gain ...


6

It depends on whether you also want to modify the N64 to support RGB output. Without modification, the best output to use from the N64 is S-video. Cables are commonly available on eBay for the N64 that support S-video, and there are upscalers that will convert S-video to HDMI 1080p. This unit from Amazon looks like it would do the job. You can also get far ...


6

Here is a guide on how to convert an old Microsoft serial mouse to work in the Amiga's mouse/joystick ports. Maybe the guide can be adapted for modern optical mice. (In fact, here is a thread about someone who seems to be claiming to do just that.) And here is a serial mouse driver for Workbench, all it needs is a serial mouse and an ordinary 9-pin to 25-...


6

No, for many reasons. The yellow connector that you are talking about is called composite video. It's called "composite" because it combines several signals: vertical synchronization, horizontal synchronization, blanking, luminance (the black-white part), and chrominance (the color part). No model of Macintosh bothered to combine these signals, ...


6

No. The Mac SE vertical and horizontal scan frequencies (designed into both the CRT yoke and the analog sweep generator circuits) are different from NTSC (and PAL) composite timing. And the Mac SE analog board requires separate vertical and horizontal sync inputs, not just a video signal. The analog board sync inputs need to be at TTL voltage levels, ...


6

The manual for the TV only lists 480i/p and higher resolutions as explicitly supported over component (which likely translates to support over composite as well). Most Nintendo 64 games ran at 240p, and as such might not be compatible with your TV. You will likely need to use a separate upscaler to bring the signal to one of the supported resolutions. Those ...


5

'Making of "Reverse emulating the NES..."' video on youtube (from tom7/suckerpinch) demonstrates the Raspberry Pi route working with additional chips and hackery to make the timing mostly work, but is glitchy. One of the tricks involved not being able to actually deliver the correct memory from the Pi in time to a read request, it would arrive a cycle late. ...


5

When I did some hard embedded work about 20 years ago, we have a set of 'EPROM Emulators'. Basically, it was a set of rams that plugged into our system in place of the system's eproms. You'd hold the system into reset, change the contents of the rams (serial link to a PC, took a second or three), and then let it run. Worked beautifully for what it was. You ...


5

The cartridge port first appeared on the Electron's Plus One expansion; those on the Master vary the meaning of a few pins but are mostly compatible — ROMs should work without modification (subject to the software, of course), but hardware is likely to be machine specific. The full pinout, including documentation of the machine differences, is contained in ...


5

Check out this source file for the technical details of the keyboard: https://github.com/mamedev/mame/blob/master/src/devices/machine/myb3k_kbd.cpp The source file contains all information you need to build your own keyboard. The serial protocol that the keyboard speaks to the host computer is unfortunately not even remotely similar to standard PC ...


5

I found this: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Active_USB_to_PS2_Adatper_(keyboard%2Bmouse).jpg don't know where to get one though.


4

Any power supply within about 5% of the rated voltage should work, so a 16V supply (or a 17V one) should work. If you're getting a modern switch-mode supply, you want the amperage rating to be at least as large as the one you're replacing, if not larger: I'd go for 2.5A or higher. If you're getting an older transformer+rectifier supply, on the other hand, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible