33

Since the price seems to be an issue, I'll suggest a cheap alternative to hard drives. A IDE Compact Flash card reader with a 4GB or 8GB compact flash card is a cheap combo, still sold (less than 10 euros for the reader on Amazon), consumes not much power (which could be an issue with a hard drive) The capacity shouldn't be an issue either. For less that 50 ...


17

I have not tried it, but according to the Wikipedia page on the Host Protected Area, one use case was to use large disks on systems whose BIOS could not cope with them. It would therefore seem to be a case of picking a likely-looking modern disk and doing a suitable hdparm -Np command on it from Linux to set a permanent HPA limit. For example, if you wanted ...


8

The spec you posted says the TV has composite in (i.e., your yellow connector from the Nintendo). The manual at that web site shows composite video going to the leftmost phono socket, labelled Video/Y. That is, one socket does double-duty for component and composite. The relevant part of the diagram is here. As to whether it'll work with your Nintendo, ...


6

The manual for the TV only lists 480i/p and higher resolutions as explicitly supported over component (which likely translates to support over composite as well). Most Nintendo 64 games ran at 240p, and as such might not be compatible with your TV. You will likely need to use a separate upscaler to bring the signal to one of the supported resolutions. Those ...


4

According to https://www.philscomputerlab.com/windows-98-maximum-hard-drive-capacity.html Win 98 supports harddrives up to 127 GB so your 60 GB drive should work fine. But never buy a HDD second hand!


4

TL;DR The Amiga AGA Alice chip can only support 2MiB of CHIP RAM because it has 20 address lines, and thus allows 2^20 (1M) by 16-bit memory access. The first Agnus chip found in the A1000 only supported 512KiB of CHIP RAM. But this was soon replaced by "Fat Agnus" in the A2000 that supported 512K x 16 (or 1MiB) of CHIP RAM using 19 address lines. ...


3

I don't see how such a thing would be technically possible. Either you need to use circuitry to adapt the signal to look CRT-ish on an existing display technology (i.e. an upscaler) or you need to eat the costs tooling up for, producing, and shipping an alternative display technology for a niche market. ...and I don't know any technology which would get you ...


3

If you want some DIY, you can try my opensource project, usb2ps2conv. It lets you make a USB-keyboard to PS/2-computer converter out of an STM32F401C-DISCO board and a couple of resistors. This project is currently in development, but it's already functional enough to control a Linux PC via a USB keyboard plugged into a PS/2 port through this converter. The ...


3

Another alternative is to use my Amiga USB Mouse Adapter that I'm selling. It`s also a true usb adapter so you can use any wired or wireless USB mouse.


2

There are some keyboards that can electrically and logically handle both USB-HID and PS/2 protocols, and just need a passive adapter to make the plug fit physically. The latter is probably what you were able to dig up. A keyboard that doesn't come with such an adapter probably only supports USB, so the adapter won't work in the first place. If you want a ...


2

My previous TV had 1 combo component/composite input (basically, if you wanted composite (RCA, the yellow/white/red), you'd plug in white and red to white and red and yellow (video) went into the green/yellow plug; for composite, you'd do red/white audio and red/green/blue video. My newest TV is like the one you show, e.g. component only. So, AFAIK, yes, ...


1

Every time we started up we had to unplug and replug to get the keyboard connected to a Windows 10 computer with a PS2 to USB adapter (which I believe is a passive unit) to work. It was plugged into a USB2 port. All I had to do was plug it into one of the computers USB3 ports and the keyboard started up perfectly with the computer afterwards no unplugging ...


1

For Windows 98; boot a linux distro and partition the disk giving Windows only the 32GByte. Then boot Win98 and install. It will work. The fact that there's more disk past the end of the partition only matters to fdisk (which will crash if you open it); but you don't run fdisk from your hard disk.


1

My experience has been that if you try to use a hard drive with a capacity beyond what the hardware will support you just get the capacity the hardware supports. The important thing is the size (3.5" or 2.5") and the interface (IDE aka PATA or SATA.) I strongly suspect you're dealing with a 2.5" IDE. Before you spend any money on it, though--...


1

In this project called PiPU, someone has already done similar to what you want to do with the Pi and the source code is available: https://github.com/rasteri/PiPU You could also use the EverDrive N8 PRO Cartridge which already has a USB port. You could connect your Pi to this or examine the flash card to find out how this was solved here: https://krikzz.com/...


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