31

The supply shown in the video will most likely blow up if you connect it to 230V mains. At 1:08 in the video you see the printing "200V" on the main filter cap. There is no plausible way to build a compact power supply like this that doesn't charge the main filter cap to 1.4 times the mains voltage. Also, as there is only a single cap, the voltage ...


14

According to Willis82 at https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/nintendo_64_forever/rumble-pak-mod-t6706.html Nintendo actually did this to kiosk rumble packs so shop owners wouldn't have to change batteries. They even went so far as to glue the battery doors shut. It's ok to run a rumble pack this way but never run 4 controllers with 4 modified packs, it draws ...


13

I can supply an anecdote from 1997-8 that might answer your question. A friend and I imported a couple of US units to New Zealand so that we could play US region games. As an aside, because the power supply was a removable module, we could slot the NZ power supply into the US unit and play US games, but they still put out NTSC and so ran at a different frame ...


9

What's the question? First problem here is what is to be considered speed. Random access time? Cycle time? Maximum memory thruput? Average memory thruput? Either value per chip or for the whole memory subsystem? For the following I'll go with maximum memory band for the whole memory subsystem. That is when a memory page is opened and successive access is ...


8

The spec you posted says the TV has composite in (i.e., your yellow connector from the Nintendo). The manual at that web site shows composite video going to the leftmost phono socket, labelled Video/Y. That is, one socket does double-duty for component and composite. The relevant part of the diagram is here. As to whether it'll work with your Nintendo, ...


7

This isn't quite guaranteed, but a good rule of thumb is that transformer-based power supplies are either used for one small voltage range (either 110-120V or 230-250V) or they have a selector switch. Switch-mode power supplies can be built for a much wider range of input voltages (90-264V is common as this includes all mains voltages used globally, complete ...


6

The manual for the TV only lists 480i/p and higher resolutions as explicitly supported over component (which likely translates to support over composite as well). Most Nintendo 64 games ran at 240p, and as such might not be compatible with your TV. You will likely need to use a separate upscaler to bring the signal to one of the supported resolutions. Those ...


6

From Rodrigo Copetti’s analysis, The RDP relies on 4 KB of TMEM (Texture memory) as a single source to load textures. Unfortunately, in practice 4 KB happened to be insufficient for high-resolution textures. Furthermore, if mipmapping is used, the available amount of memory is then reduced to half. As a result, some games used solid colours with Gouraud ...


3

Do not confuse "fast" in terms of bandwidth (bytes per second) with "fast" in terms of latency (nS from beginning of address request till when bytes are in cache). Rambus used a highly serialized protocol that required multiple clocks to even start a transaction, and more clocks to transmit the address values. Thus the combination of the ...


3

Usually you can not use any power supply outside the input range it's designed for. Multi-range power supplies will give you a rating of "Input Voltage 100..240V" on it's label. If they have dedicated input voltage rating then your input into the device should really be at that rating. You should always look for a power transformer converting your ...


2

I am not an electronics engineer, however here are a few things I noticed. At 0:33 in the video you get a brief glimpse of the label on the unit, which reads “AC110V 12VA 50–60Hz”. That is the input voltage the unit is rated for. Strictly speaking, even 110V in the US would be out of spec and nothing is guaranteed here, but that might still be within the ...


2

My previous TV had 1 combo component/composite input (basically, if you wanted composite (RCA, the yellow/white/red), you'd plug in white and red to white and red and yellow (video) went into the green/yellow plug; for composite, you'd do red/white audio and red/green/blue video. My newest TV is like the one you show, e.g. component only. So, AFAIK, yes, ...


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