33

Mode 7 is just an image warp — the programmer sets a 2d offset that is applied between each pixel and the next when proceeding in raster order. That allows 2d rotation and scaling to be applied; if you change the start position and scale per line then that’s how you get a flat perspective plane. Doom can’t make use of this for at least two reasons: it would ...


25

Neither. The level determines how fast the pieces drop. At level 9 a piece drops (assuming you don't press down) 1 row every 11 frames. So at the Gameboy's framerate of 59.73fps that means it drops at a speed of 1 row every 184ms. At level 10 it speeds up, dropping the piece every 10 frames. At level 20 it reaches a speed of 1 drop every 3 frames (50ms) and ...


21

Among other reasons: floors and ceilings of different heights would be very difficult due to the way Mode 7 is used to imitate a projective transformed plane. The effect works by setting the rotation, scale and offset of the tilemap on each scanline and these remain constant for the entire horizontal line. This can be used to render a single perfectly flat ...


12

The Japanese children's book The Stars of Famicom Games includes pictures of Super Mario Brothers 3 development for the NES/Famicom. Code was written on an HP 64000 Logic Development System and cross assembled. See also: NES (Famicom) Development Kit Hardware


11

It was most likely a pirate cart. I don't know about Finland but here in Sweden they weren't uncommon, you could often find them at fairs and similar places where traveling salespeople put up shop. Most of them were the usual "10 000 in 1" type cartridges. I have a pirate NES console called "Good Boy" that I got for free from a friend ...


10

There is nothing about the NES that enables Mario's more physics-based behaviour; credit is due to Miyamoto et al for that innovation. Algorithmically, all there really is to it is maintaining a fractional part of location and applying user input as an acceleration rather than directly as a velocity. So: 16-bit arithmetic rather than 8, two adds rather than ...


8

Yes, actually! Probably not very many early/launch titles, but some later ones did. According to Donkey Kong Country's internal header, it does indeed use FastROM. The same can be said about Tales of Phantasia.


7

TL;DR: Your confusion might steam from not being aware that DASM is just one of many 6502 capable assemblers which most came way before DASM - and some much later, like CA65. The Fine Print Would somebody care to explain how "Super Mario Bros." was released in 1985. But the DASM Assembler came out in 1987? There is no relation between Super ...


6

Direct from the SNES development manual: As for how it's possible: game consoles are almost always sold at a loss. Vendors make their money off the games (which is why they work so hard to assure that nobody but themselves can publish games for their console). Reference https://archive.org/details/SNESDevManual/book1/page/n153/mode/2up


4

I cannot answer the question from a game design standpoint, and I suspect the real answer lies there. Hopefully someone will be able to preempt my answer here with that perspective. Or does it actually require some kind of "expensive" mathematical calculation which earlier (arcade) hardware simply didn't live up to? Such calculations are not ...


3

The video circuitry was a lot simpler in those days and there was no true GPU as we have today. The video memory was part of the CPU memory space and any video circuitry merely converted it into a video signal. There was no graphics processing outside of what the CPU did. Some, particularly earlier systems use discrete components to produce a simple video ...


2

Broadly speaking, all these systems worked in the same way. The base system is always the same, generate the lines and synchronisation pulses needed to build display frames. The video circuit (could be a single chip or not) knows when it starts a single frame, and has somewhere access to memory (which can be private or shared with the microprocessor). It ...


2

A standalone processor, such as the ones you have listed, would usually only be able to perform some basic operations on integer data. This would typically be add and subtract because those operations can be trivially implemented with minimal amounts of logic (see Ben Eater's series on building a CPU on a breadboard as an example). Earlier versions of the ...


2

DASM is not the only 6502 assembler. It wasn't the first or last, either. Nintendo had their own in-house development system, which included an assembler among other tools. I'm sure that 3rd party developers used a variety of assemblers, as well. 6502 assemblers were widespread even on non-6502 platforms by the mid-80s, so it's doubtful anyone ever wrote ...


1

Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka talk about it in this interesting video about designing the game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRGRJRUWafY At 4:07 they start talking about the game physics. The idea was to simulate Mario having weight, not just dots moving in whichever direction you push the controller. "Because it's an image drawn on a flat, 2d ...


1

Not really an answer, but... ...The phrase "co-processor," can mean two different things. When you're talking about a "floating point co-processor" or "FPU," you're probably talking about a chip that extends the capabilities of the main CPU. In a very real sense, it becomes part of the CPU when it is installed. It adds ...


1

Stumbled into this question while searching for games for Family Basic. While I have no idea what kind of power the systems of the time had, I can tell you this, the original manual for Family Basic V2 (specifically Game Basic) explicitly mentions that you can write directly to any memory address of the console using the POKE function and also directly call ...


1

In this project called PiPU, someone has already done similar to what you want to do with the Pi and the source code is available: https://github.com/rasteri/PiPU You could also use the EverDrive N8 PRO Cartridge which already has a USB port. You could connect your Pi to this or examine the flash card to find out how this was solved here: https://krikzz.com/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible