11

I posted a comment on the reverse-engineering Q&A you linked before I realized it'd do better as an answer here. The answerer there found that googling Accom and Axial from your photo turns up a series of video editing controllers, and documentation for a DE-9 connector. If it's an editing controller running RS-422 over DE-9, it's almost certainly Sony 9-...


11

Does anyone know hard or time consuming it would be to achieve this? Assuming you have a modern PC with VGA out, or you can put in a graphics card with VGA out, it's not hard at all, if you know a bit about how this works. You need to look up the horizontal and vertical sync frequencies that your monitor operates with (use the documentation, or google for ...


8

The Apple IIc monitor (A2M4043) mentioned in the question takes a composite video signal. Some older laptops and graphics cards output composite or S-Video either directly or through a breakout cable. Otherwise, an external graphics adapter that interfaces to the PC via USB and outputs VGA is about $10-15. Once you're working in the analog domain, you have a ...


6

Options: (1) Googling "Accom axial" finds various people who bought it, made Youtube reviews etc. If these are not you, contact them and see if they have details. (2) As has been mentioned in the comments, you need a RS422 (not RS232) adapter, e.g. to USB. The cheapest I found after a quick search is 20 EUR. (3) You can often find the serial ...


5

SOLVED!!! After hours and hours of reading forums, installing different drivers and emulators, I managed to get it running on Windows7 64Bits and try it in PlanetSide2... Finally I can fly aircraft!!! :D The solution is to install WinWiner and vJoy. I leave you with an explanatory video. A link to the download is in the description. Greetings https://www....


5

VGA was a huge and very bold rejection of NTSC! TLDR of this whole history section: VGA and NTSC have nothing to do with each other. VGA was a blank-sheet design that smashed NTSC limitations with extreme prejudice - and planned to never, ever, ever go back. Apple IIc monitors, like most monitors of that age, use the NTSC composite video standard in all ...


4

Creating a composite signal for a monochrome monitor should be quite easy. I remember using 4 or 5 resistors to mix green, brightness, HSync and VSync from a 9-pin EGA output to construct a perfectly usable composite video signal. You will probably not find CGA or EGA adapter in 2020, but the standard 15-pin VGA looks almost as easy. The timing in VGA is ...


3

RGBI to RGB only needs a couple of diodes and resistors, see e.g. here, and that will work with VGA-RGB. I am not aware off-the-shelf ones for that are available, OTOH they are not exactly difficult to make yourself. I have no idea what @mnem means by "RGBA", usually this is an abbreviation for red-green-blue-alpha, and refers to how image data is ...


3

Raspberry Pi has composite video out built in. There's a QA here which has details relevant to configuration. One of those with the appropriate adapter/cable may be the easiest way to get that old-fashioned experience you're looking for.


3

Normally you would enter the parameters in for a custom drive. Normally you would also have to figure out what native CHS parameters for the CF card are so you can type them in or select one of existing ones that match best. As no existing type is nowhere near 500MB, you can't utilize the card for 500MB unless you type in custom parameters. As it is a 4GB ...


2

I used Xmodem and variants to transfer to/from my 286 via RS232. I remember that Data General had a program called BLAST although I suspect that it was a wrapper for Ymodem protocol. Not long before that I wrote a driver for 110-baud 20mA current loop to interface a BBC micro to a teletype that I had acquired, which had a paper tape punch. Sadly I was ...


2

On minicomputers, not quite the focus of this question, in the 1970s we used post office leased lines to transfer files. My very first professional project was to implement a remote job entry station, i.e., transfer files (representing cards) to a remote mainframe and transfer files (representing printouts) back. This was communicating between a 16-bit ...


2

There's two things here. First, where there was a need for ad-hoc transfers Kermit was very popular, supported (in the case of Lowbrow University when I worked there) by a campus-wide Gandalf network. Second, where there was a need to e.g. create installation media there were commercial boxes which supported all possible types of drive and several OSes (8&...


1

There are some solutions you could try. You can search for a monochrome VGA (actually they are multisync monitors. Search on ebay for an IBM 4707 or an IBM 8503/8504 for that 90s look. While you are at it and are lucky you could find a complete PS/2 you could use as a terminal or even try to run an older version of Linux of it (Model 90 were 486 and pentiums,...


1

CF should work. I guess this may help you: Connect the CF to your computer, no BIOS settings needed. Boot from floppy to the DOS Use utilities like WhatIDE or IDEInfo. They tell you how the system "see" the CF card (if so) You can find more details here or here.


1

Modern hard drives tend to list a CHS geometry of some large number of cylinders, 16 heads, 63 sectors. I'm reading the label on an 18GB IBM Travelstar for that; as CHS only goes up to about 8GB, the listed settings wouldn't cover the entire capacity of the drive. I think it's better to have the correct number of heads and sectors. It may then be possible ...


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