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3

AFAIK Mostek M/OS-80 was a licensed derivative of an Infosoft CP/M-compatible operating system. There is an M/OS-80 manual on bitsavers in this directory: http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/components/mostek/z80/


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The Pick operating system is mostly accessed through its dialect of BASIC, which was adopted in 1973. Nowadays you can run it as a guest OS on Windows. The Pick operating system consists of a database, dictionary, query language, procedural language (PROC), peripheral management, multi-user management and a compiled BASIC Programming language


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RSTS-11 on PDP-11, though itself written in MACRO-11, only supported user programming in BASIC-PLUS, which was a compatible extension to Dartmouth BASIC. (RSTS-11 became RSTS/E with support for other programming languages and with runtime systems providing partial compatibility with other PDP-11 operating systems, but originally it was BASIC-only) To the ...


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RISC OS Pico on the Raspberry Pi boots to BASIC. See https://www.riscosopen.org/content/downloads/raspberry-pi The "full fat" RISC OS could also be made to boot to BASIC using *CONFIGURE commands like you can with the Archimedes and RISC PC. Note that riscosopen.org do not list the RasPi4 as being compatible (and RISC OS Pico has a smaller compatibility ...


1

Everyone is talking about the improvements in software between Windows 95 and Windows 7, but in those 15 years there were huge advancements in hardware as well. You can run an identical copy of Linux on some consumer-grade hardware from 1996 and some hardware from 2016 and you will find a world of difference in system stability. Older hardware simply ...


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Addendum: Some special memory areas (eg the infamous "GDI resources") that all applications needed were extremely limited in size (due to being shared with 16-bit APIs, which needed segment size limits respected) - and very easily ran into exhaustion, with no effective safeguards present. A lot of essential system APIs did not sanity check their parameters ...


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You are comparing apples to motorcycles. Windows 95 traces its lineage back through Windows 3.x all the way to Windows 1.x and MS-DOS/PC-DOS, themselves inspired by CP/M. It was conceived and designed as a single-user, cooperatively multitasking environment in which applications have a large degree of freedom in what to do. Windows 95 moved towards a ...


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Although Windows 95 introduced support for 32 bit applications with memory protection, it was still somewhat reliant on MS DOS. For example, where native 32 bit drivers were not available, it used 16 bit DOS drivers instead. Even 32 bit applications had to be synchronized with the 16 bit DOS environment. A fault in the DOS part of the system would bring the ...


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The decision about whether to kill a process or crash the OS generally depends on whether the problem can be isolated to the process. For example, if a running process in user mode attempts to read from an address that's not present in its address space, that's not going to affect anything else. The process can be terminated cleanly. At the other extreme, ...


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