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51

They were different. You probably already know that NTSC is 60 Hz and PAL is 50 Hz. The video generation hardware was much more 'bare metal' than today (the NES color palette implementation was so bare metal that one of the colors you could select, referred to as 'blacker than black', could mess up some TVs due to the way the NES simply fed the color bits ...


28

The NES's region lock is implemented in hardware, not software, with the CIC chip. The NES contains a CIC, and each authentic cartridge contains an identical CIC. When the console is powered on, the two chips communicate via a challenge-response handshake protocol, and if the cartridge fails to provide the correct responses, the CIC on the NES resets the ...


17

The PAL video encoder was not a bottleneck of any kind. It is left out because the unit is not a PAL model, but a SECAM model, which needs a different kind of encoder. So the chip is not needed and it would be useless and just cause extra cost and power consumption in the SECAM model. The necessary SECAM encoder is integrated to the separate board with the ...


16

Basically the difference between PAL and NTSC consoles is the frame rate, 50 vs 60 Hz. The consequence of that is that PAL and NTSC mostly differ in number of cycles available for the CPU per frame, with NTSC numbers being significantly smaller. More subtle differences might be number of cycles per scanline, position of visible screen area related to the ...


14

In the early 80s, cost of RAM for the framebuffer was the dominant factor, closely followed by RAM bandwidth. The difference in resolution between NTSC and PAL systems is minimal in comparison to these factors (note that despite the different number of lines per field and different field rate, each technology used a very similar line rate of ~64us per line, ...


10

Technically, no, because usually hardware was fixed to generate the TV signal in a fixed way, instead of being programmable. Many systems had separate video chips for different TV systems, and due to the difference in the video timing or color encoding, also the clocks available in the system to run the CPU or audio chips varied. So basically, taken a NES as ...


9

What would be the ideal resolution? There is no "ideal" resolution. TV screens use "overscan", which means that the full TV image is occluded by a bezel. That doesn't matter for movies, but it does matter if you have text on the screen. So you need to choose a part of the image that would be inside the bezel of most TV models, because ...


8

According to CPCwiki Oric-1 had something that made it unnecessary to have a SECAM UHF signal. It was (one of few) computers in that price range that had RGB out connector. This made it possible to connect the computer to a TV set through a SCART connector. This connector was widely used in France, although requiring an external power source (remanufactured ...


7

If this is about connecting the color computer to television antenna input via an RF modulator, then the local TV system variant matters, as both the RF modulator for the computer and the RF demodulator in the TV are built to use a certain composite video signal bandwidth. For a 625-line 50 Hz field rate TV system, the maximum composite video signal ...


5

These answers are contradictory basically because none of them are getting down to the real meat of the issue. That is, it depends if the programmers accounted for it or not. The ease of doing this will also vary by console, as well as how severe the consequences if programmers didn't. Here are a few examples. (To simplify things I will generally assume that ...


5

Porting a game to PAL while making all actions take the same number of frames would cause the game to perform 20% slower than with NTSC. Some games did this, but other games adjusted the amount of distance objects could move per frame or reduced the number of frames required to perform various actions. Although some games could accommodate fractional-pixel ...


4

I'll take PAL to mean the specific composite-video signal format for color TV, deliberately excluding higher-resolution versions like S-video with multiple signal lines (see Wikipedia). The vertical resolution is fixed by the signal timing of 625 interlaced scan lines, meaning that you can either use interlacing and get a maximum of 576 lines with a very ...


4

The resistor network output voltages do not match the optimal modulator input voltages, and they do not have to match, as long as the modulator input voltages are within the range. The antenna RF inputs of the TVs work under various signal strength conditions anyway, like due to range to various transmitting TV stations or good/bad weather conditions. So ...


1

PAL's (and NTSC's) main technical limitation is its number of scan lines. In theory, you have 625 lines to work with, but interlacing means that you'll probably want each pixel to be at least two lines high so that it's (partially) present on the screen at all times. And if you also figure that the top 10% and bottom 10% of the screen are off-limits as a ...


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