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19

Short Answer: At the time PCI was devised, the x86 bus had already gone a long way toward being less chip specific. PCI is maybe a clean design, but some choices for signals are still 'intelish' Moving bus definition from following what a certain CPU implementation needs toward a more generic structure opens up more ways for future CPU development than ...


17

PowerPC CPUs are still produced, mainly for embedded applications, e.g. the Qorivva MPC55xx MCUs. As far as I'm aware, the only currently-produced (for some value of "produced") desktop computers using PowerPC processors are Amiga replacements: ACube Systems' AmigaOne 500 and A-EON Technology's AmigaOne X5000. Nowadays on the desktop it's pretty much all ...


14

You can "bring Rosetta back" by installing an older version of Mac OS X which supports it — Tiger, Leopard or Snow Leopard (on the latter it's an optional component). Rosetta was removed from later version for licensing reasons. If you have an installation CD for PowerPC Mac OS X, you can use a full-system emulator to run it. Currently it seems your best ...


13

The early-to-mid 1990s was a time where the future of the Personal Computer was very much up for grabs. Both the "Wintel" monopoly as a whole, and each part individually, where not at all set to be the foundations of the future PCs. Even if we were to assume that x86 would "win", we had OS/2 and to a lesser extent BeOS as competitors on ...


12

Nobody has really covered the technical aspects of the PCI bus. Until then most busses had been mere extensions of the CPU's memory bus. Zorro was essentially an extension of the 68000 memory bus, S-100 which was just the 8080 bus, and ISA was basically the 8088 memory bus. There were a number of issues with these early expansion busses. These busses used ...


10

You should open the case, or check the "About this Mac" dialog in the Apple menu: there's a fair chance your G5 has two processors, as in two complete packages. All series of G5s were available in dual-socket variants; the very last series of G5s was available with a dual-core processor, resulting in up to four cores in total. Wikipedia has the details: ...


8

It sounds like you've done what would be immediately logical, but are misunderstanding some concepts to diagnose the problem. If could be that the HFS code in the kernel is no-longer working, but its more likely there is a problem with your disk, or the permissions needed to access it. So apologies if this is too basic but.. Firstly the whole disk, is ...


8

Not a desktop PC, but the Nintendo Wii U is still manufactured and contains a Power PC processor. Also the recently discontinued Xbox 360 and Playstation 3 consoles ran on Power PC too. If you wanted to get a Power PC computer to run Linux on, you could potentially find an older generation Playstation 3 with older firmware on eBay, and use the OtherOS ...


6

There are single board computers ("SBCs") available with Power architecture processors that could possibly double as desktop machines, e.g. this one has USB and can apparently be configured with a PCI Express port, which could be used to run a graphics card (although I suspect you'll need a PCI Express 1x graphics card to make it work -- I'm aware that ...


5

You can run Rosetta (Apples PowerPC support on Intel platforms) on a Intel mac running Snow Leopard. You can now run Snow Leopard in a VM. That's a lot of hoops to run through, but might be worth it. There is also http://sheepshaver.cebix.net/ but I have no idea how well it works. The short answer is that your either going to have to find an old mac or ...


4

I’ve got a 2005 PowerMac G5, Dual 2.3 GHz with a stock Nvidia GeForce 6600 running OSX 10.4 Tiger AFAIR that's a plain 6600, right? Would adding a second GeForce 6600 from another PowerMac work or even be useful? Not really. I believe the GeForce 6600 supports only a single Dual-Link DVI output (while it has 2x DVI ports on the back) so it should support ...


4

Linux has native HFS read/write support. Most distributions do not include it by default, but if you install hfsprogs and the kernel modules, you should be able to mount the disk, or an image of it, like a regular file system. Dealing with the resource fork, however, is a bit complicated that way, so you can't expect applications and such to work if just ...


3

There are a few details with x86 inheritance in PCI : Little Endian only. Big Endian CPUs (such as PowerPCs as default) had to adapt to that bus by using reversed endian instructions, or bus swap hardware in PCI controllers. IO address space. Competing RISC CPUs (PowerPCs, ARM, SPARC...) didn't use IO ports (well in POWER it was obsoleted IIRC), only memory-...


3

The answer to your question 1. is YES. Their rationale was a simple and effective business strategy. An approach that sacrificed proprietary control in exchange for market penetration. To illustrate that strategy:- The oil industry presented the automobile manufacturers with a simple but effective common denominator, the petrol pump with its standardised ...


3

As far as I know, there's no way to bring Rosetta back - so your only option (providing you have OS X install discs with PPC support), would be to set up PearPC - which emulates an entire system. That being said, I don't know how well it runs - I only played with an 0.1 a very long time ago, and none of the more recent versions.


1

Assuming that your host computer has an Intel CPU and you wanted the most recent version of Rosetta, then you could run Snow Leopard 10.6.8 on VirtualBox. Unfortunately, just having Rosetta may not solve all your problems because some PowerPC applications or games require the classic Mac environment. In this case, you would need the classic MacOS 9 ...


1

Are PowerPC processors still used in desktop/home computers, or has Intel processors taken over? If I wanted to get a PowerPC computer, is there a place I can still get them? They have pretty much disappeared from personal computers. Due to the low production volume they can't compete with x86 or ARM CPUs. As a result nowadays they generally only exist in ...


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