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4

How come there are C compilers not written by Bell Labs? ;-) As far as I am aware, there is no prohibition on producing your own implementation of a programming language based on the description of that programming language. You can't copy someone else's implementation without their permission. You don't need to reverse-engineer an implementation if ...


-1

Javascript became a standard known as EMCA Script, and Microsoft's implementation of it was JScript.


7

Games have "sets" (AKA versions). The software changes but not the hardware. For instance Pengo set 2 is harder than set 1 and has a different music (to avoid lawsuits?) If you can "mod" an existing game, then ignore the checksums, you could run your own game. You would have messages like: g8x_p6.bin WRONG CHECKSUMS: EXPECTED: CRC(7e3471d3) SHA1(...


2

One option not mentioned yet, was that we did nothing and lived with the bug as it was.


7

The key, I think, is that what we think of today as "arithmetic instructions" were in the Analytical Engine broken down into parts. To add two numbers, the sequence is + // operation card: set mill for addition L 001 // variable card: load column 001 to first mill input L 002 // variable card: load column 002 to second mill input, // ...


5

How were the 70's and 80's coin-op programmed? Not much different from today. But most definitely in a more hands on manner. Of course, all of this depended quite a lot on the company (size), target platform and most of all the time you're asking. Development changed extrem over just a few years from the mid 1970s to the mid 1980s. Where the very first ...


12

Of course, there were hundreds of different standup arcade games, utilizing different hardware, and different developers creating software for them using different tools. So, there's no "one-size-fits-all" answer to your question. Rather, there were some general-purpose low-level ways of doing development back then that were fairly universal. First, early ...


16

The assembly (or, more rarely, compilation) was generally done on a minicomputer, such as a VAX 11. The tools were often written in-house. They might have some sort of simulation software to help test some of the code, but in the end you'd use a PROM burner to burn your code on to EPROMs (EEPROMs were not widely available in the '80s) and plug them into a ...


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