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4

This depends quite on the value of the 'minimum 128KB as shipped' footnote. For the Apple II, it was possible in 1983 to order a IIe with 64 or 128 KiB, but it wasn't until the IIc in 1984 that these 128 KiB were soldered in. Even the very last IIe, the Platimum, which was sold only with 128 KiB, had them factory installed as a (then very small) card in the ...


13

Soviet: ES PEVM (IBM PC clone) - 1986 Okean-240 (128 KB, Intel 8080 class) - 1986 UKNC (192 KB, PDP-11 class) - 1987 DVK-3M (248 KB, PDP-11 class) - 1987 Korvet (112-256 KB, Intel 8080 class) - 1987 BK-0011 (128 KB, PDP-11 class) - 1989 Poisk (IBM PC clone) - 1989 Iskra-1030 (IBM PC clone) - 1989 Agat (Apple clone) - 1989 Bashkiria-2M (128 KB, ...


24

The Apple III came with a minimum of 128K of RAM (expandable to 512K) two years before Commodore had a series of CBM-II computers with 128K minimum and expandable to 896K in 1982 a year before the IBM PC XT and 2 years before the Apple Macintosh and IIc. The IBM PC had 64K minimum. 1980: Apple III 1982: Commodore CBM-II 500 / 600 / 700 Series 1983: IBM PC ...


32

Despite the 144 pin DIMM form factor, this is not a SDRAM, but an EDO module with 16 MiB capacity. The used RAM chips are KM48C2104 (KM48 marks RAMs) Manufactured by Samsung, of 16 MiBit Capacity EDO-RAMs, with 2Mi by 8 Organization and 60ns speed (the -6 marking) They are not SDRAM, as such would be numbered as KM48Sx with X being L for 66 MHz and H for ...


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