13

Search the web for the term "Retrobrite" or "Retr0bright". You will also find numerous sources (including YouTube) for recipes and how-to's using OxyClean and other sodium percarbonate-based products which yield hydrogen peroxide in solution or in a paste form. These techniques are very popular for whitening cases with the Apple ][ and Atari communities. ...


12

PowerPC CPUs are still produced, mainly for embedded applications, e.g. the Qorivva MPC55xx MCUs. As far as I'm aware, the only currently-produced (for some value of "produced") desktop computers using PowerPC processors are Amiga replacements: ACube Systems' AmigaOne 500 and A-EON Technology's AmigaOne X1000. Nowadays on the desktop it's pretty much all ...


11

As someone who owns around 70 vintage computers (8/16 bit), leaky caps are a big concern for me. In my experiences, batteries leak far more often than capacitors. Obviously, electrolytic capacitors can, and often do, leak. Companies like Commodore didn't exactly use high quality parts. So the shelf life for those electrolytic caps isn't long. Yet, I ...


11

Disclaimer: This answer is not known to be accurate. From the information you've provided so far it's tricky to give complete advice, but here's a start: Removing corrosion The low CMOS battery error might be caused by battery leakage; from what I've seen of leaky batteries, they do appear rusty. This can cause significant damage to components. To ...


10

This clearly needs a "depends" answer. There are known places where I wouldn't even dare to switch on a computer without replacing caps first - The Sinclair ZX Spectrum series is such a candidate - It features an analogue voltage step-up circuit for the memory supply voltage generation that is known to be able to simply fry all of your otherwise perfectly ...


10

For the mouse ball, remove it and clean the rollers with some rubbing alcohol and a q-tip or if its really grungy, pick the crud off with your fingers first. The ball itself can usually just be wiped off with a dry cloth. As for the yellowing of the casing that's normally a problem with the casing discolouring due to flame retardants oxidizing the plastic. ...


10

I think this is something that will change over the years, but if I was to make a current observation by drawing parallels to the automobile industry, I would say "sort of". While I'm not trying to say that retro computer collecting is going to be exactly like the automobile realm, there are a few points to note: Original paint is far more valuable than a ...


8

I do not have any anecdotal evidence, but scientific evidence seems to show that color restoration through use of hydrogen peroxide is a temporary solution to a long term problem. A related question/answer on Chemistry SE reveals that plastics are damaged by UV light and that this damage does result in color changes. The bromine you mentioned additionally ...


7

There is very little information online about this, so I have scraped around and put this together: The screws on the Amiga 500 and 500+ were often Phillips (requiring a #2 Phillips head screwdriver[1]), but hex-socket (Allen key) screws were also used[4]. trall measured the external case screws on an A500 case that appear to be original. They are Torx T9, ...


7

I used the method outlined here by Javier Rivera on my Apple IIc Plus and it worked fine. Javier does a lot of RetroBrite projects and posts a number of results to the Apple II Enthusiasts Facebook group. He also gave a presentation on methods at KansasFest 2015 and did a live session with anyone who wanted to go through the process with him. http://www....


7

Unfortunately there were a few "revisions" of the mouse, and the pads on the mouse side were not always signed; the color coding isn't guaranteed to be repeatable either. If your mouse has the pins marked on board, you can use the pinout of this extension cord to match them. If there isn't, you'll have to match them "by hand". Cut the mouse cable a very ...


7

The datasheet for that part can be found here, it lists the maximum for VBAT as 4.0 V, so yes you do need to regulate down from 5 V.


6

wizzwizz4 has a good answer about cleaning up the corrosive chemicals to stop the damage getting any worse, so I won't duplicate that information. But here are a few more suggestions. My experience is with the Amiga computers, where the retro computer enthusiasts speak of Varta with howls of anguish - the damage you have seen here has affected thousands of ...


6

I have used recipes from here with great success: http://www.retr0bright.com/make.html I used the second recipe with a high concentration hydrogen peroxide. I was able to find the high concentration hydrogen peroxide at a local co-op store marked as "food grade". Here is that recipe: Lorne's Variant Recipe Lorne at Vintage Computer Forums prefers ...


6

It is possible that the old lubrication on the sticking part has absorbed some fluff or grit and so is no longer working as a lubricant. The build-up of muck could be around the point where the arm latches. Your screwdriver trick could be freeing it enough to work for a while. I would clean the part as much as possible. Use a residue-free solvent - I ...


6

Old plastic changing colors or damaged Plastics which have been exposed to the sun often fade because the ultraviolet light breaks down molecules in the surface layer. Plastics can also age due to exposure to oxygen and other reactive gases in the air, which breaks down molecules in the plastic surface. Both of these conditions can sometimes be seen if ...


6

Disclaimer: I don't have enough experience to know which of these pins, if any, need to be NOTted in the converter. I could not find information about voltage either, so I have ignored it. Use a multimeter before trying this. Make sure that the test floppy is unimportant and that you disconnect the drive if it is making suspicious noises. In addition, ...


6

I don't know if this is the "best" solution, but I have found applying Singer light sewing machine oil to a dried-out fabric printer ribbon appears to be effective. This oil is odorless. Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000YZ1Y06 Apply sparingly a drop at a time, and then set the ribbon aside and allow it time to soak or it will make a mess on the paper ...


6

The old computer cases I saw were some pretty thick sheet metal, almost exactly like old car bodies from pre-1970s (enough metal that they can rust outside for years and still be sanded down & used without having holes everywhere). Treating it just like a car body paint repair would work fine. It sounds like it's just a couple very small spots, so I ...


6

This answer is not strictly related to your question: you can re-create PCB (nowadays PCB manufacturing is cheap) and then just resolder key components on the newer one (also replacing such things as electrolytic capacitors). If you already have a broken ZX, accurate soldering off of all components could be made, then the empty PCB could be both sides ...


6

The ULA chip in the ZX Spectrum (48K version at least) has been completely (100%) reversed engineered by Chris Smith. He released the design to the public (look up his book...it's amazing) and since then, people have created new boards that will fit in a ZX Spectrum case. These boards (along with off-the-shelf components) can recreate the functionality of ...


5

Your capacitors are definitely bad, you should get that goo off of the board asap, however the damage may already be done. you might consider using a tooth brush while you're at it I've washed boards and powered them up same day after drying them with a heat gun, but be careful, a heat gun will melt stuff if you leave it in one place for too long. Another ...


5

I recently cleaned my amiga 3000 main board using denatured alcohol and q-tips. It took a few sessions over the course of a few days, but the board looks brand new. Of course, you have to be careful around stickers or possible sharpie marker writing, or wax pencil marks... but if you take your time the results can really be astounding.


5

According to jdv's answer to another question, cotton swabs and isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol will do the trick. Try to keep the alcohol away from plastics, use it sparingly and be gentle when you rub the dirt. His answer also says that "fancy contact cleaner" will work: For example, "CRC QD Contact Cleaner". Make sure you don't get the type used for ...


5

A pink pencil eraser is a reasonable contact cleaner for this sort of thing. Just scrub the black dots a bit and see if they will respond to softer pressure.


5

It's not clear from your question you're trying to do. A DS12887 "chip" has its own internal battery. It's actually not a chip, but a module containing a DS12885 chip, a crystal and a small lithium battery. The module only has one power supply connection, a +5V VCC pin and this pin must be connected to the +5V power supply during normal operation. It has no ...


5

In the old days(tm) it was common to reink fabric ribbons for typewriters, in fact, the early ones where made that way. I kept using that practice during the 70s and 80s for daisy wheel and dot matrix printers. In theory ribbons could be reinked an unlimited time, but in reality wear on the fabric (too much movement due the hammer) limited this to like a ...


5

'Original look' is at least debatable, if not a myth. If you're serious about history, then preserve the scratches as well. Clean them, and, if needed, add some conservation wax or alike. Nothing that can't be removed later on again. For storage/use in a controlled environment like home / office / museum without intense stress there is no need to be ...


4

There are single board computers ("SBCs") available with Power architecture processors that could possibly double as desktop machines, e.g. this one has USB and can apparently be configured with a PCI Express port, which could be used to run a graphics card (although I suspect you'll need a PCI Express 1x graphics card to make it work -- I'm aware that ...


4

Not a desktop PC, but the Nintendo Wii U is still manufactured and contains a Power PC processor. Also the recently discontinued Xbox 360 and Playstation 3 consoles ran on Power PC too. If you wanted to get a Power PC computer to run Linux on, you could potentially find an older generation Playstation 3 with older firmware on eBay, and use the OtherOS ...


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