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21

In the UK in the 1980s and the early 1990s, no video input at all was common. Early video recorders and set top boxes (for the new digital channels) would use RF out. You would disconnect the aerial from the TV, connect it to the VCR or STB, and connect the VCR or STB to the TV with another aerial cable. The TV would see it as an extra channel. You might ...


19

The 64 has separate outputs on the video port for luma and chroma which you can adapt to an S-Video output. There are a few caveats, however. The chroma signal is a bit "hot" compared to the S-Video standard. The S-Video spec for the chroma line for NTSC is 626.70mVP-P (75% Color Bars), 835.60mVP-P (100% Color Bars) and for PAL 663.80mVP-P (75% Color Bars)...


19

Up until ~1980 the only connectors TV sets had were Belling-Lee type antenna in. So most VCR and next to all home computers did use RF modulated output toward the TV set (*1). This included even cable networks. While Type F connectors where used for more sophisticated equipment, households were still fitted with Belling-Lee. Professional equipment of the ...


19

S-Video relies on colour transformation from RGB to YUV, and then takes the U and V and modulates them using a colour subcarrier. The TV has to undo all these steps in order to get the original RGB signal. If the subcarrier frequency is not in phase with the pixel clock (as will be the case if using different crystals), then moving artifacts will show up in ...


15

Before SCART, European TVs often had not video input at all or S-Video on 6-pin or 8-pin DIN sockets (not Mini-DIN). Cinch composite was uncommon until VCRs came out. After that the old S-Video connectors died out and it was most common for cheap TV sets to have only an antenna and one composite in, better TV sets had a SCART input very early. Component ...


10

To stay on-topic for the RetroComputing SE, I'll only answer for the video connectors commonly seen on retro systems: The first thing to keep in mind is that you cannot always rely on the connector shape alone to know what it is carrying. The best example of this is the venerable RCA connector, which is used for all kinds of different signals. Sometimes (...


7

Some Matrox cards output composite and S-Video using the HD15 port; for example, the G450 PCI (see the TV output chapter in its manual). The adapter cable was optional though and isn’t commonly included with the graphics adapter.


6

Here are the practical differences in the context of retrocomputing: At the lowest end is RF. The picture is pretty noisy and requires a TV with antenna screw terminals or coax, or a modulator to convert the signal to composite + audio. Audio and video is sent as a single signal. The next step up is composite which provides a much clearer picture by ...


5

TVs in Czechoslovakia (mainly TESLA brand) Till approximately 1985 TVs had only the antenna input. See1, 2 later almost all the colour TVs had composite input small devices had DIN-6 connectors with composite input (used also by Grundig and Sony) large devices had SCART connectors with composite input probably none of the TVs had RGB pins connected it ...


4

For the home market, TVs were often used because of their easy availability: most households already had one, and the image was often good enough for the low resolution of early machines. Professional users would often buy a purpose-made computer monitor, which would become essential as display resolutions increased and computers entered the GUI era. I'll ...


3

The answer will depend a lot on what application you have in mind. There is a clarity difference, but how much it will matter will depend on how large of a display the output is going to as to how much you'll notice. On a 20" desktop monitor, you probably won't notice a huge difference, on a 50" TV the difference will be more pronounced. The other factor ...


3

I'm not so sure about your question. The C64 signal is a pretty standard signal, but you got to use a Commodore specific cable anyway, as the C64 outlet isn't compatible to any standard. So buying a ready made cable will be the best solution - or wire one like described in the links you presented. Just take care that it's a 262° / DIN 41524 plug (not the ...


1

I still have a small CRT TV in my house (belongs to my landlord) which has a composite video input on the front (which can still be used with a Raspberry Pi), and a SCART socket on the back. The latter is used with a digital TV receiver, as the analogue TV signal has long since been switched off. For context, this is in Finland. In the UK, I remember the ...


1

Some background: TVs of the area before video recorders, satellite receivers etc became common and worked best with a baseband video connection, did have little reason to offer such a connection. Neither would such a connection have been trivial to implement or retrofit. TVs of that era were very commonly of a so called live chassis design, which made it ...


1

Component video would seem a better choice than SVGA. I don't have any circuit designs handy, but using four video op amps and some resistors it should be possible to convert most forms of "VGA" video into a component video signal that should be usable on many kinds of LCD screen.


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