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21

In the UK in the 1980s and the early 1990s, no video input at all was common. Early video recorders and set top boxes (for the new digital channels) would use RF out. You would disconnect the aerial from the TV, connect it to the VCR or STB, and connect the VCR or STB to the TV with another aerial cable. The TV would see it as an extra channel. You might ...


19

Up until ~1980 the only connectors TV sets had were Belling-Lee type antenna in. So most VCR and next to all home computers did use RF modulated output toward the TV set (*1). This included even cable networks. While Type F connectors where used for more sophisticated equipment, households were still fitted with Belling-Lee. Professional equipment of the ...


15

Before SCART, European TVs often had not video input at all or S-Video on 6-pin or 8-pin DIN sockets (not Mini-DIN). Cinch composite was uncommon until VCRs came out. After that the old S-Video connectors died out and it was most common for cheap TV sets to have only an antenna and one composite in, better TV sets had a SCART input very early. Component ...


9

Black-and-white hi-res from the 1040 STE on a VGA monitor should work with a direct connection and no tricky electronics at all (just the adapter cable) Atari VGA GND 13----X---- GND ---------4 GND Sense 4----+ +--------------2 green ...


8

The problem you have is that most home computers of that era output TV standard signals which VGA is not. As you've mentioned there needs to be some conversion from one standard to the other. A popular solution that I happen to use is the Gonbes GBS-8200/GBS-8220 boards. They aren't perfect and some people hate them but they are reasonably cheap and I think ...


8

Caveat: 'Why Not' questions are like 'What If' and rarely have a definite answer. It's an (educated) speculation at best. In case of interface and connectors, NIH (Not Invented Here) is a big issue. Beside the fact that adding more interfaces costs money, manufacturers usually love to have closed systems where they control - and most important sell all ...


7

You have three problems to overcome: Separate sync from composite video or CSYNC into H and V to get an RGBHV output. Upscale/scan double from 15 kHz to the 31 kHz that most VGA monitors accept. Separate out the audio. The $89 Ambery 15Khz RGB CGA to VGA RGBHV Converter Scaler is a device that appears to do the first two, but I have no experience with it. ...


5

SCART is a connector standard, not a video standard. I think it can carry composite, s-videos (chroma/luma), analog RGB, audio and possible other formats depending on what is producing the signal. So there isn't a one size fits all to 'convert' SCART to VGA. However, without checking, if memory serves, I think the 1040 produces analog RGB, so if the ...


5

As you know it's a French invention, and over here at some point, all TV sets that were to be sold in France must had such socket. The indirect consequence is that any TV connected device sold here went this road too (video game console, personal computer, etc) very early as the other choice was RF because ironically, CVBS sockets on TVs started being ...


5

TVs in Czechoslovakia (mainly TESLA brand) Till approximately 1985 TVs had only the antenna input. See1, 2 later almost all the colour TVs had composite input small devices had DIN-6 connectors with composite input (used also by Grundig and Sony) large devices had SCART connectors with composite input probably none of the TVs had RGB pins connected it ...


4

As a counter-example, SCART connectors were used on some computer monitors. I own a Phillips CM8833, which accepts RGB or CVBS input through a SCART connector (or separate connectors). This particular monitor was bought for use with an Acorn Archimedes computer via SCART (TTL RGB), but it was also popular for Atari and Spectrum machines. There are pictures ...


4

For the home market, TVs were often used because of their easy availability: most households already had one, and the image was often good enough for the low resolution of early machines. Professional users would often buy a purpose-made computer monitor, which would become essential as display resolutions increased and computers entered the GUI era. I'll ...


4

For my STE, I go straight from RGB to VGA using: An ST RGB SCART cable (this one) A sync stripper (Sync Strike) An LCD monitor that accepts 15kHz VGA (BenQ RL2455HM) This is a clean solution without the need for scan convertors / line doublers and provides a razor sharp picture


4

Another possibility would be to use a cheap USB video capture device, such as this one. (You'll also need a SCART to composite video adapter, which you can buy or wire up yourself). Connect the video oputput of your Atari (or whatever you have) to the USB video capture device, the USB capture device to a modern PC, and then you can see the video output on ...


3

As has been noted in comments, you have probably damaged your ZX Spectrum+'s hardware by reversing the polarity of the power supply. In mcleod_ideafix's answer to the relevant question this is explained in more detail: You have damaged your Spectrum for sure. [...] [The 7805 regulator] is designed to survive overvoltage and short circuit conditions, but ...


1

I still have a small CRT TV in my house (belongs to my landlord) which has a composite video input on the front (which can still be used with a Raspberry Pi), and a SCART socket on the back. The latter is used with a digital TV receiver, as the analogue TV signal has long since been switched off. For context, this is in Finland. In the UK, I remember the ...


1

Some background: TVs of the area before video recorders, satellite receivers etc became common and worked best with a baseband video connection, did have little reason to offer such a connection. Neither would such a connection have been trivial to implement or retrofit. TVs of that era were very commonly of a so called live chassis design, which made it ...


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