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18

If "a more modern machine" includes systems with ISA, PCI or PCI Express slots, it should be easy enough to retrieve the data from the drives. You'll need a SCSI adapter (known as a host bus adapter, HBA); you can find loads on auction sites, or SCSI4ME and other places (depending on which country you live in). Adaptec cards are very good and well-supported ...


17

When you're designing a system you might want to avoid messing with floppy controllers. Just implement a SCSI interface as a one-for-all and use SCSI drives, no matter what medium. Clean approach.


15

Some parts of SASI were used in the Atari ST family’s ACSI system, in particular for hard drives connected to that interface — see Application Notes on the Atari Computer System Interface for details. Whether that counts as “popular” depends on your interpretation and the markets you’re interested in. SASI controllers and hard drives were used in minis too, ...


12

This is a SCSI device, so it shouldn’t be too hard to get the data off the device. You need the following pieces of equipment: a SCSI controller, known as a host bus adapter (HBA); these are available for most buses, including USB (getting rare though), PCI and PCI Express (the last two are still easy enough to find, especially second-hand; expect to pay a ...


11

The back looks like a 50 Pin Centronics. I am just not sure how I can connect such a device using modern computers, if at all. Any suggestions or guidances would be much appreciated! Well, it seems to be a classic 50 Pin SCSI-1 interface - or at least compatible. So do it the same way it always has been done: Get yourself an SCSI interface card. Jup, it's ...


10

For non-PC/home computer systems (UNIX workstations, small implementations of mainframe architectures) it could have been cumbersome to use some of the existing floppy controller chips, since they were usually optimized for certain microprocessor and/or bus systems different from what these machines used - or knowledge how to set these chips up was not ...


9

The SASI protocol, if anything, was used by "The Sider" hard drive for the Apple II series of computers. Though hard drives on the Apple II weren't very common, it wasn't until 1985 that "The Sider" appeared and was considerably less expensive than its predecessors and as a result became rather popular in the Apple II community. That being said, The Sider ...


8

ProDOS provides a common device driver API for storage systems, but does not specify a partition table format. Rather, the SCSI (or other) HD interface card has firmware to map partitions to ProDOS volumes. The Apple SCSI Card and Apple High-speed SCSI Card for the Apple ][+, //e, IIGS utilize the Apple Partition Map, just like with their Classic Macintosh ...


6

The SCSI controller is not a limiting factor. The Apple II SCSI controller electronics, and SCSI protocol, would support accessing the blocks of a very large disk. However, managing those blocks is all done by some DOS software, and ProDOS imposes some more severe constraints. ProDOS manages the disk as volumes and partitions, and does both these in a ...


6

It's a normal 8272-style floppy interface that just happens to be on the same card as the SCSI controller. It should work in any motherboard with ISA slots, provided the motherboard doesn't have an integrated floppy controller of its own - or, if it does, that the integrated FDC can be disabled. The DIP switch is used to enable or disable the floppy ...


6

Bus: yes should negotiate. Device size: possibly okay. If your OS can issue (and your scsi controller supports) a read(16), then you'll get the full capacity. If it only supports read(10), then it'll look like a 2TB volume (assuming the drive is bigger!). I've heard of some random old controllers that didn't support read(16) and caused problems for big ...


6

The Amiga can support multiple mass storage controllers, subject to the following necessary limitations: Any time multiple controllers are using AutoConfig, each controller must correctly support the AutoConfig protocol. This means it must pass the token to other controllers on the bus so that each controller gets a chance to configure itself. Each mass ...


5

The point is: When SASI was en vogue (and that was only a very short timeframe, because technology was soon superseded with SCSI and the simpler ST506 and later ATA standards), hard disks weren't very popular for low and mid-range computers. If you look at early hard disks, for a short time (a time frame of maybe 2-3 years in the early 1980s) SASI was the ...


5

The first thing you need to do is to open the front door of the drive and inspect the rubber roller that drives the tape. It is not uncommon for the roller on old drives to have deteriorated into a black goo. You don't want that stuff fouling your tapes. Second, you need to inspect your tapes and ensure that the belts are still good. These belts develop ...


4

The Amiga A4000T is the only Amiga to include both a SCSI-II controller and an IDE interface on the motherboard. And, if you can believe the entry in the BBOAH is also THE RAREST home computer ever, with only ~35 known to exist. Note: This is referring to the units manufactured by Commodore, and not those that followed the bankruptcy. Anyway, she's a rare ...


4

I've never used these, but look around on comp.sys.apple2 for answers to your questions ... There are rumours that some of the later Sider models were actually SCSI. Almost all were SASI. The SASI ones need the original controller to be read if you want to keep what's on the drive. The only SCSI card that can use the Sider is the RamFAST/SCSI (because the ...


3

If you want to access what is on the disk, most likely you'll need the Xebec SASI interface card (this is what came with the Sider). The ROM versions on the card could make a difference since there were a few revisions and even one aftermarket one that allowed the whole 20MB to be used instead of the standard 16MB limit of the stock ROMs. However, if you don'...


3

HVD in the SCSI standards was 'according to RS-485', which allows up to -7V and +12V on the differential wiring, though limits the difference signal to the (0V, 5V) range. There is a separate line in SCSI standards for identifying HVD, LVD (low-voltage differential) and single-ended (SE, based on each pair of wires being one dedicated ground, and one open-...


2

Almost all SCSI devices are either 8-bit wide and have a 50-pin connector with single-ended (open collector, no differential drive) electrical signals, or are 16-bit wide, using LVD differential signalling AND having a fallback capability to work with single-ended drives if the wiring harness connects the right sense pins. There are 68-pin data connectors (...


1

Japan. In Japan, the SASI interface is relatively widely used. We can recall the NEC PC-98 and Sharp X68000 families, as well as less common systems.


1

To start with, SLR1 is what Tandberg called QIC-150. They may as well have been one of the last manufacturers of QIC-150 compatible drives. Next, QIC-150 was defined (and first offered) in 1984. THe last standard document is dated June 1991. Further, there is no real sense in looking for a 'latest' drive, as that may be an IBM device with a mainframe ...


1

Personal experience: your mileage may vary I had an 15K RPM U320 disk drive salvaged from a year 2004 Dell Precision workstation and thought I could replace the one in a year 2000 IBM Intellistation M PRO that has an integrated Adaptec 2940 with three ports. Even though the drive had jumpers to downgrade the size/protocol and effectively showed up at boot, ...


1

Because the machines using them had no other storage bus. At the end of the 90s I had an (already old) Sun Sparcbook. It only had a SCSI bus, so its built in floppy was SCSI.


1

You may have some luck by selecting option 2 in Clonezilla: "Use the same CPU level with that of this DRBL server." Source


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