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56

SCSI, I think, is a serial interface. No, it isn't. SCSI das defined as a parallel interface for high speed data transfer. Though there are modern incarnations using serial transfer, while being compatible on a logical level, which might add confusion. A standard serial port on PCs used a 9-pin DSub connector where a parallel port used a 25-pin connector. ...


10

The role of Termcap in contemporary Unix-style systems is the same as it always has been: it provides a library and database allowing software to adapt to the varying capabilities of different terminals. These terminals can be physical (connected to a serial port, typically) or virtual, provided by any one of a number of terminal emulators (the console on ...


9

Then why did SCSI require so many pins? Differential signaling. The original standard was actually a 25-pin system using an 8-bit parallel signal going in one direction only. There was a separate parity pin, and lots of signal pins for things like device select and flow control. But in many respects it was similar to the DB-25 printer cable, just faster. ...


7

There’s a related question, How can I take an image of a 50-pin SCSI hard-drive, which covers most approaches available to connect a 50-pin SCSI drive to a recent-ish computer. Limiting options to a laptop means the only option to connect the drive to your computer is to use a USB-to-SCSI adapter. These aren’t manufactured any more, as far as I’m aware; but ...


5

Erm. I think here are a few misunderstandings at work. Termcap is a descriptional database about terminal features (*1), not device configurations. In sense of Unix terminals aren't devices, but something connected to a device. In a more general sense, Unix-devices are (*2) interfaces that can be accessed using OS measures. It may be this basic mixup ...


5

My hypothesis is as follows: The last time you successfully formatted the drive to be bootable, you did it with something that only understands FAT16 booting, so it installed a boot sector that only knows how to hand off to FAT16 partitions. When you formatted for FAT32, you didn't properly ask for a bootable FAT32 partition, so you've got a boot sector ...


1

The HP ScanJet 5p may have done. I ran one under Linux before 2002, and it needed a different SCSI driver that was sold as part of the tummy.com XVScan package. It referred to itself as a "SCSI SG driver", so maybe?


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