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Share Your Experience: Take the 2024 Developer Survey
32 votes

Is there a reason why Apple servers did not catch on?

In a word: Linux Why would anyone pay a premium for Apple’s proprietary hardware, when it is far cheaper — and more flexible — to get an Intel-based server and install some flavor of Linux on it? For ...
Giacomo1968's user avatar
30 votes
Accepted

Is there a reason why Apple servers did not catch on?

I can tell you why it never caught on in my lab. We bought a Mac "Blue and White" to try out OSX server to add to our collection of Suns and (rather old) VAXes. While the hardware was nice, ...
John Doty's user avatar
  • 2,799
21 votes

Is there a reason why Apple servers did not catch on?

Apple servers were found where there was a lot of Apple clients. For example, a university IT department that hosted the Mac OS (faculty or labs) would often have Apple servers. But I think you're ...
bjb's user avatar
  • 16.4k
18 votes

History of High Availability in the mainframe and minicomputer eras?

I'm pretty certain the concept of RAS (reliability, availability, serviceability) has been in IBM's mainframe line since very early on. I always found it funny that one of the big selling features of ...
paxdiablo's user avatar
  • 4,877
9 votes

History of High Availability in the mainframe and minicomputer eras?

Two high availability systems which predate Tandem Computers: The IBM 9020 (a cluster based on IBM/360 mainframes) was developed for US air traffic control and is described in IBM Systems Journal 1967 ...
grahamj42's user avatar
  • 1,162
8 votes

History of High Availability in the mainframe and minicomputer eras?

Every Solution Needs a Problem High Availability is like any other concept only useful in a context that needs such. Here the context is non planned requests at random time - or in other words: Online ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 224k
5 votes

History of High Availability in the mainframe and minicomputer eras?

Some examples of high availability systems from the 1960s and 1970s include: IBM's System/360 Model 67 and System/360 Model 195 were mainframe computers that used hardware redundancy to improve ...
Facebook's user avatar
  • 151
3 votes

How the I/O performance of legacy mainframes/minicomputers in different architectures is measured and benchmarked comparatively?

Powerful in computing power, mainframes were irreplaceable thanks to the capability of processing numerous transactions rather than doing the math. True. At least when using a /360ish mainline. Those ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 224k
1 vote

Is there a reason why Apple servers did not catch on?

At least one Apple Xserve tester basically said that for them FiberChannel was required if a box would be deployed in the DC. They tried a Xserve, was impressed by the speed but the machine was a non-...
Stefan Skoglund's user avatar

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