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52

They were different. You probably already know that NTSC is 60 Hz and PAL is 50 Hz. The video generation hardware was much more 'bare metal' than today (the NES color palette implementation was so bare metal that one of the colors you could select, referred to as 'blacker than black', could mess up some TVs due to the way the NES simply fed the color bits ...


33

Mode 7 is just an image warp — the programmer sets a 2d offset that is applied between each pixel and the next when proceeding in raster order. That allows 2d rotation and scaling to be applied; if you change the start position and scale per line then that’s how you get a flat perspective plane. Doom can’t make use of this for at least two reasons: it would ...


31

The SNES hardware doesn’t implement perspective, it implements affine transforms of the background layer. Affine transforms aren’t sufficient for perspective. Perspective is implemented by changing the affine transform at every scanline, to change the scale. This is what allows parallel lines to be transformed so that they aren’t parallel on-screen, thus ...


21

Among other reasons: floors and ceilings of different heights would be very difficult due to the way Mode 7 is used to imitate a projective transformed plane. The effect works by setting the rotation, scale and offset of the tilemap on each scanline and these remain constant for the entire horizontal line. This can be used to render a single perfectly flat ...


16

Basically the difference between PAL and NTSC consoles is the frame rate, 50 vs 60 Hz. The consequence of that is that PAL and NTSC mostly differ in number of cycles available for the CPU per frame, with NTSC numbers being significantly smaller. More subtle differences might be number of cycles per scanline, position of visible screen area related to the ...


11

The reason for this is that Pocket Monster is an unlicensed SNES game released in September 1998, and in being an unlicensed game, it does not need to uphold itself to Nintendo's licensing standards. It stole both graphics and audio freely from many games, including the title screen music from Disney's Bonkers. I would imagine that the same stolen music ...


10

Technically, no, because usually hardware was fixed to generate the TV signal in a fixed way, instead of being programmable. Many systems had separate video chips for different TV systems, and due to the difference in the video timing or color encoding, also the clocks available in the system to run the CPU or audio chips varied. So basically, taken a NES as ...


10

These adapters do nothing else than defeat the lockout chip so that e.g. a PAL region console can be forcibly made to execute code from a cartridge whose content is originally intended to run on an NTSC region console. Which simply means that if the software is made to expect certain features of the NTSC hardware (such as CPU clock speed, frame rate, etc) ...


9

I find very conflicting and confusing info online on this. It seems to be from France... or Spain... or Italy?! Not sure how these countries made the list or how they are conencted to the model number. SNSP is simply the PAL version of the SNES (Maybe for Super Nintendo System Pal ?). Designation I know are SNS -> US (NTSC) SNSP -> Europe (PAL) SNSM -...


9

Looking at the pictures on iFixit, the two PCBs that fit behind the shoulder buttons don't seem to be reinforced by anything much: Excess pressure on the shoulder buttons might bend these boards slightly away and cause the connection to not be made. The alternative is corrosion on the connection traces; you say you have tried contact cleaner. Try bending ...


8

Yes, actually! Probably not very many early/launch titles, but some later ones did. According to Donkey Kong Country's internal header, it does indeed use FastROM. The same can be said about Tales of Phantasia.


6

Direct from the SNES development manual: As for how it's possible: game consoles are almost always sold at a loss. Vendors make their money off the games (which is why they work so hard to assure that nobody but themselves can publish games for their console). Reference https://archive.org/details/SNESDevManual/book1/page/n153/mode/2up


5

These answers are contradictory basically because none of them are getting down to the real meat of the issue. That is, it depends if the programmers accounted for it or not. The ease of doing this will also vary by console, as well as how severe the consequences if programmers didn't. Here are a few examples. (To simplify things I will generally assume that ...


4

The header file that is used in your linked source code directs WLA to compile for a ROM using the LOROM map and the first 32K of ROM are mapped into bank 0 at offsets $8000-$FFFF. So your (mapped) code starts at offset $8000, not 0. As for the VBlank label: the header expects an NMI routine at that label, so your code must define an interrupt routine for ...


3

https://github.com/mamedev/mame/blob/master/src/mame/drivers/magmax.cpp A quick look through that file shows a hardware capable of both a tile background and Sprite foreground. static const gfx_layout charlayout = { 8, 8, // 8*8 characters 256, // 256 characters 4, // 4 bits per pixel { 0, 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 0, 12, 8, 20, 16, 28, 24 }, ...


1

The hardware is different, but not so different as to prevent most games from playing. Yes, they ran slower because of the frame rate difference. That was par for the course, and quite a few commercially released PAL games had the exact same issue. Yes, the music would be slower and off-pitch... this one was more likely to be corrected in the "official&...


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