28

This website might help. A guy (Chris Covell) picked up a children's picture book in Japan which shows kids how NES games were made. (Mostly focussing on Super Mario Bros. 3) Chris actually scanned the whole book and translated it so you can read it on the website! The book shows many things such as designing (with Shigeru Miyamoto smoking), programming, ...


23

I worked with one and it was a pain to use. It was a cartridge made of static ram; the computer would write the contents to the cartridge and you would manually reset the console. it was slow, the upload would sometimes fail and there was no way to communicate anything back to the computer. We were using an assembler under MSDOS to make the games. On the ...


17

Alcatel-Lucent won a lawsuit against MS in 2008 on a patent for audio file playback. That was later overruled by a higher court. Bristol Technology attacked MS for not revealing needed Windows sources and entering other markets. MS was charged to pay $1M to Bristol in 2000. Spyglass, the company that originally built what is Internet Explorer today, filed ...


16

Stac Electronics obtained a 1994 judgment against Microsoft for patent infringement, based on Microsoft's use of knowledge it had learnt from Stac's source code for Stacker, which it had obtained while considering a purchase of the company, during implementation of DoubleSpace. Microsoft filed an appeal but Stac one-upped them with a successful injunction ...


16

So I've been doing a little more research on this and it appears that in the early days of the NES, Nintendo did not license a dev kit themselves. Developers were forced to hack away and make their own dev kits. A popular one at the time was the "NES Mission Control" created by Rocket Science Production. Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure and The Mutant ...


14

It used the same C compiler that shipped with the Indy workstation. See: Nintendo 64 Development Manual: C Compiler Suite It required a few flags not normally used when building C programs for the Indy itself. And there were utilities for downloading to the development boards and converting executables into ROM images. Some IDE's were available for UNIX ...


14

I can only really answer from my own perspective, and I only wrote real code (other than simple BASIC programs) on an Atari over the last couple of years. IDE Used In terms of classic tools IDEs were relatively light compared to tools you get today. I worked using Devpac 3, which is a good assembler that includes some useful features and a debugger. STOS ...


13

I used to program on the Atari about 20+ years ago, so I might be a bit rusty on the subject. Also I used to mainly write demo effects and music, so I wasn't working on core game development directly (other than writing music for some). IDE is a more modern concept, so you probably won't find one on the platform itself, but there are some out there for ...


7

Build it on a Linux VM of the era. The tools will probably expect command lines of GCC of the time, as well as libraries current at that time. I'd say something like Debian 2.0 or Redhat 7 (not RHEL!) should be OK.


7

I worked for a company that created a TMS34010 TIGA product in the before times. It was a pretty awful chip, all things considered. Very expensive, relative to competing products, made worse by requiring lots of expensive VRAM memory (for both code and data memory) for decent performance, even though they advertised you could use cheap DRAM to build cheap ...


5

The CPS-1 was actually based on the Sharp X68000 computer system. The X68000 was a powerful Japanese computer that had impressive graphics and sound. By basing the CPS-1 hardware on its capabilities it was possible to write games for the X68000 and then do a very light "port" to the arcade system. The X68000 also ran software for creating graphics and audio,...


4

Hi and welcome to Retrocomputing StackExchange. Two good archives for Classic Macintosh software, both of which include some Modula-2 dev environments for 68K Macintoshes like the SE/30. macintoshgarden.org macintoshrepository.org Searching either one for "Modula-2" has some results, but nothing from Metrowerks, unfortunately. "p1 Modula-2" appears to ...


4

The nearest I can think of — though still very far from CBM prg Studio's integration — is CPCtelera. It's mostly for C development, and the BASIC and debugging components that make prg Studio so clever aren't there. I didn't find any shining stars in the Programming:Cross Development - CPCWiki category. I've mostly made do with a mix of z88dk's appmake and ...


2

I used DevPac all along for assembler and GFABasic for the tools. I remember that the Omikron basic was very popular in Germany. A lot of people starting had hopes with STOS, but I never got into it.


2

I used, and still have, the Laser C compiler for Atari ST. It is the later version of what was first branded as the Megamax C compiler. It was/is actually a pretty good C dev environment. It has quite a few libraries for useful functions and relevant stuff for the hardware and OS.


2

I very much enjoyed this blog post which discusses how to get started with 68k assembly and DevPac3. The learning curve with assembly is very steep, but it does offer you the best performance. If you want a gentler introduction to ST games programming, I can recommend STOS. It's a flavour of BASIC specifically designed for creating games.


1

I did a quick search for macOS versions of the Gameboy Development kit and I found this: https://github.com/x43x61x69/gbdk-osx it doesn't build on my Mac but it looks like the issue is just one of locating build directories properly. However, it does include the source code of lcc and maccer.


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