37

As others have mentioned, PCem is still perfectly usable, even if it’s no longer maintained by its original author (who is, or at least was, open to handing over maintenance to someone else, should someone step up). Since you’re on Windows, which has an excellent track record for maintaining backwards compatibility, it’s likely that the existing Windows ...


35

Executable files for 16-bit Windows are usually laid out in the now-rather-inaccurately-named New Executable format. Most current Windows executable analysis tools do not support this format; they can only read files in the 32-bit and 64-bit Portable Executable format. This is what the error message you cited is trying to tell you. As for how to extract ...


16

The old IDA freeware ver.3.7 supports Z80. It has a Turbo Vision style interface, which may be something that puts you off. It is also no longer distributed officially. However, it is very powerful, and if you can live with its quirks, you will be able to find it on many abandonware websites. Alternatively, a lot of people started switching to NSA-developed ...


12

There was Lotus ScreenCam, which was initially released for Windows 3. It used its own SCM format, which only recorded events and optional audio. Later versions (I’m not sure which, or whether this was ever available in a Windows 3- or Win32s-compatible version) could convert SCM videos to Flash. Here’s a screenshot of ScreenCam 2, which is included in Lotus ...


10

MCAmiga fits the bill, it’s pretty much Midnight Commander for the Amiga and uses the keyboard extensively.


8

There is the Linmodem project, made by (who else) Fabrice Bellard. Unfortunately, it is more of a proof-of-concept than a working, ready-to-use driver, and it has been abandoned in that state in 2000. It barely contains incomplete implementations of four Hayes/AT commands and the V.34 protocol, and has not been ported to the modern Linux audio stack (ALSA),...


6

There's quite a few browser-based ones on PCjs. PCx86 emulates the Intel 8088, 80186, 80286 and 80386 CPUs, and it faithfully renders characters and graphics produced by the IBM Monochrome Display Adapter (MDA), Color Graphics Adapter (CGA), Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA), and Video Graphics Array (VGA) video cards. Support for assorted motherboard and ...


6

Is BOCHS any good for this sort of thing? Bochs can be compiled to emulate many different x86 CPUs, from early 386 to the most recent x86-64 Intel and AMD processors which may even not reached the market yet. It has a good built-in debugger (so you can single-step machine instructions even with interrupts disabled) that's widely recommended for "OS ...


5

If you want to compile amiga programs so they run on Linux (because you have the source code), you can use a native compiler and AROS (amiga research OS) development files (includes and libraries) You'll get a Linux executable but with AROS OS simulation layer. You may stumble into endianness issues but since your question was "can I emulate AmigaOS ...


4

I know you said 286+, though I think the list would be incomplete without mentioning PCE. It performs full emulation of IBM PC/XT (8088) hardware that implements the chipset/ISA using the actual BIOS images of the PC, video cards and hard drive controllers. I believe it does aim to do cycle-accurate hardware emulation too. It is an actively maintained ...


4

Since you mentioned PCem, consider 86Box. It's what I've been using; unfortunately it doesn't have Linux version so I need either a dual-boot or a VM. 86Box is a low level x86 emulator that runs older operating systems and software designed for IBM PC systems and compatibles from 1981 through fairly recent system designs based on the PCI bus.


4

USB floppy drives only support a limited set of disk formats: 720KiB (on DD floppies only), 1440KiB (“standard” HD), and in some cases, 1232KiB (“mode 3”, the format used on X68000 systems) and 1200KiB (so that 5.25” HD images can be written). If your images are 1440KiB images, then all that’s needed is to extract the raw sector image, and write it using cp ...


4

I want to expand a little bit on SciTech Display Doctor (SDD). Versions 5.3a and 6.53 support Windows 3.1x through Windows 95 (version 6.53 can be installed in Windows 98, but VESA driver is unusable). Version 7.0a supports Windows 95 and Windows 98. Despite SDD claims to support Windows 3.1x, the only Windows-specific thing it installs is some wconfig.exe ...


3

In case of uncompressed images, you can extract them (without having to use an actual diskette) using Aaru (ex-DiscImageChef). AFAIK there is no modern tool which handles compressed images (staring with AA 5A), but there exist DIUNPACK.EXE for OS/2 which supposedly handles them (available on SAC.SK). DIUNPACK Release 3.03 01-30-96 Copyright (C) IBM ...


3

There are people around who are running BBS on dialup and emulated lines. The answers given in this related question (which is C64-specific) give some sources of software that may be useful to you. In particular The BBS Corner. However, the site hasn't been updated for a while so you may have to dig around a little.


2

Not terribly authentic if it is all simulated like that. But more importantly, there is the complication that while much of a modem's capabilities can be handled by software instead of hardware (personally I never found that soft-modems worked very well, but that's a separate issue), the sound card input/output is not going to have the on-off capability and, ...


2

Seems what you want is actually a cross-compiler (native binaries on native system targetted at foreign system and cpu) not an emulator with a compiler running on it. I could be wrong, but it seems the former is actually less work than the latter. Of course, there is value in a general compatibility layer that works for the cli, but compilers are arguably a ...


2

The commercial ($100) cross assembler Cross-32 Meta-Assembler V4.0 by Data Sync Engineering claims to be able to do it: http://www.cdadapter.com/cross32.htm The assembler naken_asm by Michael Kohn is also listed as 'tested' for the TMS34010: http://www.mikekohn.net/micro/naken_asm.php Author added support for TMS34010 because they wanted it for Mortal Kombat....


2

I've done my first shares of Genesis disassembly with Charles Doty's DISASM.exe. Please, note that you will need to run it in DOSBox.


1

There was a tool from Borland that came with Borland Delphi 1.0. You pointed it at an EXE and it would show you all the resources that were embedded in the file. It was extremely useful. I don't remember the name of the application, maybe something like "Resource Viewer" or "Resource Manager"? Maybe something like that. If I recall, ...


1

DESQView is probably the best answer, but if you were often online back in the early '90s, you might have used Telemate and its multitasking abilities. Telemate is mainly a terminal emulator, but you could run DOS commands even while transferring a file. It worked best with a mouse. Here is a short demonstration video.


1

Aside from the DOS world, there are several UNIX-like systems that fit on an 8086 PC platform. Minix 2.0 in particular comes to mind, and I do know it can run on the HP 200LX. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MINIX


1

If you object using non-demo ida pro, you can try Ghidra tool, which is much like ida pro (and not simply an disassembler!). It is open source and does support 68000.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible