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-1

it can't be done. Really? The two generals problem applies to any two way communication channel that does not have perfect reliability. So that means, if you phone your friend to arrange to go out for a beer, the two generals problem applies. How can you be sure that your communication exchange has worked? The reason is because when you say on the ...


3

The key to making problems like the Two Generals Problem solvable is to categorize some failure modes as annoying but tolerable. For example, a variation analogous to a mutex would have a goal of attacking the enemy with only one general's army, and regard the possibility of both generals' armies attacking at once as unacceptable (e.g. because they'd be ...


8

Not really an answer to whether there were such systems, but a comment on that section of the Unix-haters Handbook. In the mid 1980s I implemented a (non-Unix, non-SMTP) mail sending agent that had the same "responsibility" (non-)issue: the sender required the final status from the receiver, else it would resend later, thus a window existed for potential ...


27

If you can ensure a reliable connection, synchronous, atomic operations can indeed be implemented using various techniques that also work for remote connections, much in the same way as they can be implemented on local multi-processor systems. The quoted claim doesn't make any statement about the distance of the separate computers or the quality of their ...


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