47

@user253751 and @WimC are correct, this fade is achieved by drawing a semi-transparent rectangle over the screen, but using a transparency mode where the rectangle's color is subtracted from the color of the background. The PS1 has four semi-transparency modes (search this for "Semi Transparency"). The one used here is mode 2 in which the result of ...


30

The SNES hardware doesn’t implement perspective, it implements affine transforms of the background layer. Affine transforms aren’t sufficient for perspective. Perspective is implemented by changing the affine transform at every scanline, to change the scale. This is what allows parallel lines to be transformed so that they aren’t parallel on-screen, thus ...


18

You don’t need two buffers at 640x480 because television is interlaced — each field is only 640x240; if you can render at 60Hz then you can always draw the next field while the current is being output and therefore maintain proper even/odd sampling positions for a genuine interlaced signal. This is even a better solution than a 640x480 buffer because it ...


16

This effect happens when the luminosity curve of the image is adjusted like so: This is called gamma correction and is a fairly common feature of graphics processing software and GPUs. My research has not turned up anything to suggest that the PS1 supports this feature natively in hardware, although it can be emulated in software fairly easily.


11

There can't be a simple answer, as there are many ways to reach that effect depending on console/hardware used. Using some 'overlay' needs incredible computing power and is usually tied to rather high end 3D engines. A way simpler method is cycling/dampening the colours. Here each colour used is replaced by a dimmer variant. An effect that is already easy ...


8

Firstly, on the "difficulty" of programming a teleport routine: Teleporting an NPC when it gets stuck is actually a relatively straight-forward task to achieve. Identifying when an NPC has gotten caught is simple: you can calculate the Euclidian distance between the NPC and the player, and if it exceeds some threshold X, then you conclude that the ...


5

For one thing, fixed point is not necessarily cheaper to calculate than floating point, e.g. 32-bit fixed-point multiply actually costs more than 32-bit floating point multiply: https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/368862/transistor-count-of-floating-point-multiplier The conclusion is only true when accepting a good amount of restrictions, wich ...


3

For PC VGA, which definitely has just 256 colours on screen that are picked from the 16 million available via a look up table, such fades are definitely done by changing just the palette definition every 0.1 seconds or something like that. If you do it naively, you just substract a fixed value from each R, G, B component on each frame. The consequence is ...


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