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22

So the way Wikipedia puts it, sounds like the decision was basically made by committee. And that's what it was - and what made it succeed. A standardized disk format with a drive interface compatible with existing controllers. As I understood it, the big breakthrough for the 90 mm format that ended up winning, was getting into the Macintosh [...] Not ...


7

According to the Wikipedia article on the PB 170: Though released at the same time as the PowerBook 140 and PowerBook 100, both the 140 and 170 were designed entirely by Apple, while the 100 was being miniaturized by Sony from the full-sized Macintosh Portable. As a result, the 170 represents the very first PowerBook created by Apple, with the 100 actually ...


6

This is covered in one of the major Mac history works, although I can't recall specifically which one. When Jobs was putting together his supplier list the 3.5 had been standardized, as Raff notes, but you still had lots of companies pushing their own formats. Machines with all of these could be found on the market. Jobs went to Japan to visit with the ...


3

The two disk systems' technology were completely different. The Famicom's disk system used a magnetic-storage floppy disk, which (according to Wikipedia) had a total capacity of 112 kilobytes (56kB per side). These were also known as Super Disks. Even when launched in 1986, this was relatively small: since 1984 IBM's PC-AT could store 1.2MB on a 5 1/4" ...


1

Archive.org has a copy of CliƩ files that Rich Legg mirrored on his website. These include a file by the name of CFUtilityPelaca0603.zip, which appears to be a June 2003 version of Pelaca's CFUtility (1.0.3). There are also a number of other CliƩ-related files there. CFUtility is provided as a .exe file, and requires Palm Desktop to be installed on the ...


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