46

TL;DR: In the US Channel 3 was preferred as it was in the midst of the continious 2/3/4 assignment. By lifting or lowering the carrier by 6 Mhz either channel 2 or 4 could be offered as alternative. Another-Dave already answered the basic issue of avoiding collisions. The reason why it was channel 2/3/4 is due historic channel assignment (in the US, *1). ...


38

Why tune the TV to a channel at all? Early consumer television sets were built for one purpose: to watch broadcast television. The only input was for an antenna. The idea of using your television set for any other purpose simply wasn't yet conceived, so there were no connectors for any other kind of signal. The first additional uses for household ...


12

It's a one-way Teletext system. Basically, the pages are sent in conjunction with the broadcast signal. The TV receiver knows how to extract the page information from the analog video signal. As you noted television broadcasts are one-way; all of the page content would be sent one page after the next. The receiver could cache this information if desired ...


12

Short answer: No. At least not for display purposes. The pixels shown are artefacts when the VDP is operation in modes with more than 224 lines (NTSC). These lines were usually not displayed on real TV boxes. Nonetheless, the VDP did generate the lines from whatever tiles it did find at the proper locations. Depending on the game they where uninitialized, ...


11

Because those are the two frequencies that the RF modulator in the game console can produce. "Tuning to a channel" means "choosing the frequency band to receive", so clearly you need to receive on the same frequency band that the transmitter is sending. (Warning, non-electronic-engineer loose wording above). Why was there a choice of two rather than one ...


11

This information is based on information from the DEC VT220 Technical Manual. I've not actually tried this out myself, but it did work for the OP when he tried it. TLDR: Yes, it's likely to work, and quite cheap to try using a sub-$1 BNC to RCA adapter if you already have an RCA-RCA video cable. Section 1.4 says that the "BNC connector for composite video ...


9

Ceefax uses the Teletext system. This protocol encodes data, such as text, in the vertical blanking periods of the PAL video signal. Each packet is 45 bytes long, where each byte is normally sent with the LSB first.p17 Packets could be sent from lines 6 to 22 and 318 to 335 inclusive.p14 Each data packet occupies one TV line.p15 The first three bytes are ...


8

The spec you posted says the TV has composite in (i.e., your yellow connector from the Nintendo). The manual at that web site shows composite video going to the leftmost phono socket, labelled Video/Y. That is, one socket does double-duty for component and composite. The relevant part of the diagram is here. As to whether it'll work with your Nintendo, ...


7

The color RAM in the Genesis video chip is single ported such that at any given time the color RAM data bus either contains the data being read out of it for display purposes, or the data being written into the RAM by the CPU or by DMA. Outside of the active display area the overscan color can be defined by software. The video chip shows this color for each ...


6

The manual for the TV only lists 480i/p and higher resolutions as explicitly supported over component (which likely translates to support over composite as well). Most Nintendo 64 games ran at 240p, and as such might not be compatible with your TV. You will likely need to use a separate upscaler to bring the signal to one of the supported resolutions. Those ...


6

The bandwidth of a typical composite video signal is about 6 MHz. The video hardware in in early game consoles (and early home computers) generates its composite video signal in what's called baseband format: the frequency range is 0 Hz to 6 MHz. Only one baseband signal can be sent down a cable or broadcast through the air at any one time.¹ So that we can ...


5

TL;DR: Channel 36, within Europe's (and most of the world's) 8MHz spacing) is positioned at 591.25 MHz (video carrier) which is the same frequency as channel 34 in the US with its 6 Mhz spacing (*1). Thus the same modulator (circuit/unit) can be used in European and US devices, simplifying production - and making it a cheap part to buy for a product needing ...


3

I don't see how such a thing would be technically possible. Either you need to use circuitry to adapt the signal to look CRT-ish on an existing display technology (i.e. an upscaler) or you need to eat the costs tooling up for, producing, and shipping an alternative display technology for a niche market. ...and I don't know any technology which would get you ...


2

My previous TV had 1 combo component/composite input (basically, if you wanted composite (RCA, the yellow/white/red), you'd plug in white and red to white and red and yellow (video) went into the green/yellow plug; for composite, you'd do red/white audio and red/green/blue video. My newest TV is like the one you show, e.g. component only. So, AFAIK, yes, ...


2

Europe: UHF Channel 36 was reserved for aerospace navigation until the 1980s (at least in Europe), thus was used for both VCRs and home computers. (The manufacturers could be sure their device wouldn't overlap with any existing programs the user might want to receive).


2

If I may offer a concise answer: Because while today's TVs have a multitude of direct input options - RGB on phono jacks, SCART, HDMI and others - there used to be only an aerial socket. So devices like VCRs and video games had to pretend to be a TV program, broadcast on a specific channel. Obviously it was a good idea to choose a channel that was 'spare',...


2

Developers did occasionally use the overscan color as a profiling/debugging tool. By setting the overscan to a different color at the start of each major section of the game loop code, it was possible to see what proportion of a frame period was taken by different sections of game logic. You could also see how much time margin you had at different points in ...


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