38

The new additions mentioned are mostly to be found in the new Symbols for Legacy Computing block (PDF link) covering the 1FB00–1FBFF codepoint range. This block includes: a large number of BLOCK SEXTANT characters like 🬥 BLOCK SEXTANT-1236 ("The term 'sextant' refers to block mosaics divided into six parts." Also note because these definitions are new, ...


20

As ecm wrote, DOSEMU supports this, using -t or -dumb. This works with the original DOSEMU and DOSEMU2. -dumb runs DOS programs in “dumb” terminal mode, where output goes to DOSEMU’s standard output and can thus be scrolled back in your terminal or redirected. -t uses S-Lang to provide an emulation of a PC text-mode screen inside the terminal, with colours, ...


8

There's also ecm's fork of 8086tiny, ecm-pushbx/8086tiny: ecm's repository for 8086tiny: a tiny PC emulator/virtual machine. Unlike dosemu, it runs on an emulated (not virtual) processor so will run on more hosts. keaston/cp437: Emulates an old-style "code page 437" / "IBM-PC" character set terminal on a modern UTF-8 terminal emulator. is ...


4

I've used both 5250 and 3270 terminals and the main differences were the twinax cabling and a little local smarts that allowed the 5250 to download a screen format form that could perform some data validations in the terminal


4

Teletypes were self contained units simply executing the code received. For most codes that simply meant printing a certain character and advance by one position. Others advanced paper by one line (LF), returned the carriage by one position (BS) returned the carriage to the begin of a line (CR) or rung a bell (BEL) All of this was done by mechanics using ...


4

This answer may not contain a good enough image( although the last link may also be useful since it seems to use identical font ), here is part of an image on the following catalog - That catalog can be downloaded at - https://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102646159 https://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/...


3

It's important to keep in mind, that there weren't that much symbols using overstrike in basic (IBM) APL. By using an 8 bit codeset they all could be integrated. The most common charset was Page 293 which extends EBCDIC with all legal APL codes. Symbols that get generated per overstrike, like log (⍟ which is 'Power-Overstrike' or PO), got their own code ...


3

Some 3270 terminals supported an optional Programmed Symbols feature, allowing the use of arbitrary character bitmaps. This was available on the 3279 Color Display Station (models 2B and 3B), the 3278 Display Station (models 2, 3 and 4) and the 3270 PC (with the Programmed Symbols card).


3

SOLVED: I am thinking of the ADDS Consul 980, from 1974: The display was black on white. It did support lowercase. Solomon Slow is correct. The Data General C/150 certainly supported "console characteristics" which could disable lowercase transmission (i.e. it would convert lowercase bytes to uppercase before transmitting them to the terminal), and I did ...


1

For actual Teletypes, which are electromechanical devices whose output is ink on paper, there were these ways to move the print position (there was no actual cursor): Carriage return: mechanically move typehead to column 1. Line feed: mechanically roll the paper Any printing character: move one place to the right after printing From memory, I don't think ...


1

Since the BBC Micro had a Teletext chip (SAA5050) and used it for its MODE 7 and the Teletext character set was added (I believe in that revision), it had its character set added, although, maybe just be coincidence ;)


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