22

As ecm wrote, DOSEMU supports this, using -t or -dumb. This works with the original DOSEMU and DOSEMU2. -dumb runs DOS programs in “dumb” terminal mode, where output goes to DOSEMU’s standard output and can thus be scrolled back in your terminal or redirected. -t uses S-Lang to provide an emulation of a PC text-mode screen inside the terminal, with colours, ...


19

TL;DR: It's a classic case of technological advancement vs. installed base In the early days of electricity-based communication (i.e., telegraph and later TTY) there was no way to detect a voltage and, when needed, amplify it. Only current flowing in a closed circuit could be detected reliably—by having it run through a coil which in turn moved a lever—and ...


17

Wikipedia, unsurprisingly, gives incomplete information. A number of important new technologies were developed as part of the five-year R&D of SABRE, including a disk drive capable of storing that many reservations, a new transaction-processing system, a frequency-modulation system to send data over the phone lines, and a new model of terminal, pictured ...


16

The current loop goes all the way back to classic telegraphy. If there's current flowing, then that's one state. If there's no current, then that's another state. It's as simple as it can be. You don't need to manipulate voltages. That's the key. Just turn a literal switch on and off. It also has problems. Current losses are heavy even in short ...


12

I don't have any experience with the exact modification you are talking about. However, I think it is a relevant point that the design of the firmware for Commodore microcomputers included a "screen editor" as a separate bit of software from the BASIC interpreter. As far as I know, all the CBM 8-bit machines had this design. So, it is very possible ...


11

I would have written just a comment but did not have enough rep to do so. @JdeBP had basically found the answer so all I had to google was "Youtube comment finder" :). The video also posts a linked reddit discussion which clears up the first question everyone asked: The plant is Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant, decommissioned in 1994 and completed by ...


10

But in between those [Batch vs. Terminal], there was an era of 'interactivity, but not as we know it', when computers supported interactive work by teletype. Not really. To start with, these were complete different usage scenarios. Batch didn't turn into terminal use - or got replaced by it. Batch is like mass production on industrial scale. It still ...


9

There's also ecm's fork of 8086tiny, ecm-pushbx/8086tiny: ecm's repository for 8086tiny: a tiny PC emulator/virtual machine. Unlike dosemu, it runs on an emulated (not virtual) processor so will run on more hosts. keaston/cp437: Emulates an old-style "code page 437" / "IBM-PC" character set terminal on a modern UTF-8 terminal emulator. is ...


8

The advantage of RS-232 was that it was a formal standard that defined the electrical interface between equipment, down to handshake signal usage, voltage levels and connector pinout. Even though devices only implemented a relevant subset of the standard, and the implementations did vary and were sometimes not directly compatible, in general, only a simple ...


7

As comments have suggested, it was quite a bit like other smart terminals such as a VT-100. The terminal had an RS-232 connection to the mainframe. But (at least as of the Plato V) it also have an 8080 in the terminal, with its own 8-bit expansion bus, so in many ways it was similar to something like an Apple II or TRS-80 (etc.) with a serial card--able to ...


5

TL;DR A Plato terminal is kind of a character mode terminal on steroids. As such it supports of course any output by the connected host (push) without prior request from the terminal (after beeing connected ofc.). A Bit of History What you call 'push' is the natural way any classic terminal works. No matter if interactive or a printer (*1). It's a device ...


5

Current loops are better for signal integrity for long runs because they are generally only "grounded" to a fixed potential at the current source. This means that there's no "ground loop" for stray magnetic fields to interact with. For electromechanical devices this is easy to implement: switches and relays don't need a common "...


5

a company like DEC that made both the computers and the terminals Actually a lot of DEC computers (PDP-8, PDP-11) had teletypes as I/O devices. Teletypes used 20ma current loops so DEC needed to provide such. Only later did DECWriters and the VT series of CRTs become the usual I/O.


5

A few pieces: Why does one so often hear of payroll, specifically, being an early application of such systems? It seems to me this is partly because the payroll of a big company involved a lot of repetitive calculation, but also because it's particularly amenable to that sort of processing: multiply hours worked by hourly wage, output pay due that worker ...


5

For a relatively late example which you could run today under an emulator, I would suggest dBase II, a database program for 8-bit microcomputers. As the Wikipedia article goes into, it was based on an earlier program for mainframe computers. The CP/M version worked with dumb terminals, and I bet at least some early users had printing terminals. This ...


5

Several sources around the web repeat the notion that the VT05 was a "drop-in replacement" for the (ASR33) teletype. For example, on gunkies.org: The VT05 Alphanumeric Display Terminal (technically, the VT05B, but documentation usually referred to it as the 'VT05') was one of DEC's first video terminals. It supported all the same format control ...


5

What did real VTxxx do? Certainly the VT220 does the same as what xterm does. It just shows the top or bottom half of the character. I don't recall this behaviour depending on the emulation mode. I'm assuming the other VT's do the same as the VT220. It'd make for much simpler implementation.


4

First, Payroll is really apt for batch processing. It runs once a week or twice a month in general, and it tends to be all done at once on "payday". So each week the operators key in the time cards, then they process them, they run and audit the reports, then they cut the checks. Big, meaty processing tasks done in bulk, vs high density transaction ...


4

I've used both 5250 and 3270 terminals and the main differences were the twinax cabling and a little local smarts that allowed the 5250 to download a screen format form that could perform some data validations in the terminal


3

Some 3270 terminals supported an optional Programmed Symbols feature, allowing the use of arbitrary character bitmaps. This was available on the 3279 Color Display Station (models 2B and 3B), the 3278 Display Station (models 2, 3 and 4) and the 3270 PC (with the Programmed Symbols card).


3

SOLVED: I am thinking of the ADDS Consul 980, from 1974: The display was black on white. It did support lowercase. Solomon Slow is correct. The Data General C/150 certainly supported "console characteristics" which could disable lowercase transmission (i.e. it would convert lowercase bytes to uppercase before transmitting them to the terminal), and I did ...


3

I was a student pilot in the late 60's and teletypes were used as terminals to the weather services. I would consider that an end user interactive system. As I remember, it was line command driven and the speeds were slow enough that there were lots of abbreviations used to cut down on the characters transmitted. This was confusing and could easily lead to ...


2

In the 1960s, many major languages such as FORTRAN and COBOL specified a line length of 72 characters. This was largely due to the limitations of the 80 column punch cards with which they had been originally programmed. An IBM punch card used 8 columns for a sequence number, leaving 72 to encode characters. This practical limitation was enshrined in the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible