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1

This is a logical–physical geometry mismatch. Like @Justme’s answer explains, the ‘logical’ geometry used by the BIOS disk interrupt services, and the ‘physical’ geometry reported by the disk controller are not necessarily the same. This is because the BIOS interrupt call interface and the hardware interface of the ATA controller establish different limits ...


9

The problem is in the geometry. Not in the physical disk geometry, but rather in the translation how the BIOS must translate the geometry for DOS when using disks larger than 1024 cylinders. The laptop, or very close model of it, was sold with an 800 MB drive, so we have to assume that the laptop properly supports disks larger than 504 MiB, i.e. disks with ...


6

Whew, I've got it solved! I took one of the disk images with Windows 95 installed on it, and examined it with a hex editor. I noticed that when the Windows installer program initially sets up the system files on the C: drive, it puts IO.SYS rather "far" into the filesystem, actually more than 100 MB inward. What I tried then was to perform a clean ...


0

You didn't specify what you are using for an emulated environment to create images, but I'll assume it is DOSBox. I routinely use DOSBox to create DOS disk images on my modern Linux machine and transfer those images (using 'dd') to various, diverse, MS-DOS compatible computers. This works fine as there are no real differences in virgin/vanilla MS-DOS ...


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