11

MOD is an operator, not a function. Try ? 10 mod 9 and see yourself.


9

Thanks in large part to the Tandy-Terminfo project, which provides ready-to-compile .terminfo definition for the TRS-80 Model 100 and Tandy Models 102 and 200, I believe the answer is: yes. For example the sequence Esc E will clear the screen, the sequence Esc H will move the cursor "Home", etc. These are set up in that mentioned terminfo file and backed up ...


8

The Sinclair QL also had two RS232C ports which used an unusual combination of a ASIC (ZX8302) and Intel 8049 to provide two physical ports (with non standard connectors) but could not be used independently. The two ports were nominally for printer and modem use, but during development the built in modem of the QL was dropped, but the case retained the ...


7

As you mentioned, you could upgrade TRS-80 Model 100's RAM to 32k. You can also get a REX chip, which uses the ROM expansion slot to provide additional flash memory. The TRS-80 Model 100 had several peripherals available (in addition to the acoustic coupler) including a cassette recorder, an external drive, a barcode reader, printers, and even a "Disk/...


4

Your question isn't very clear. If the question is "Would it be possible to design a memory expansion module for the Model 100 that adds large amounts of additional memory?", then the answer is yes. The Model 100 has its system bus exposed on the expansion connector. It would certainly be possible to design a memory expansion that adds a memory window to ...


4

If you want to use a 102 display in a 100, you've got an annoying task ahead - While User12's answer shows that they are electrically the same, the connector is very different. The Model 100 has a 2 row connector with (I believe) .100 pin spacing. Similar to what you'd see on an old IDE drive. The 102 has a flat ribbon that pushes into a connector on the PCB....


4

does the board have any sockets for ICs ? if yes remove all chips and pull them back (not all at once do it one by one) sometimes the pins oxidize and or get out of the socket a bit making bigger resistance and noisy buses creating havoc usually ending up with freeze or reset or gfx errors. Be careful not to bend and or broke the pins and use the same IC ...


4

The NES with its multitap accessory is a potential answer, if you'll accept some logic in the accessory. NES controllers use a 1-bit serial protocol. The host strobes to begin a transfer, causing the joypad to load its current state into a shift register, and the host then clocks in 8 bits, each representing one of the 8 inputs. It's actually the CPU that ...


4

A second bite of the cherry: amongst others, the WD177x family are popular floppy controllers that were used in or with a variety of 8-bit machines including the MSX, the Acorn Electron and later models of the BBC Micro, the Oric and the TRS-80. They are serial controllers because floppy drives provide a single data line, which the controller monitors for ...


3

In the Commodore 16/116/Plus-4, the Cassette connector and the serial (floppy and printer) port are both implemented via the CPU's single built-in I/O port which can be accessed by code at addresses $0000/$0001 (the same port that is used for the bank switching logic in the C64). Most lines of the two interfaces use separate bits of that one 8-bit port, but ...


3

The Sinclair ZX81 had a single Uncommitted Logic Array (ULA) chip that controlled both the screen and the cassette port. Consequently, accessing the cassette (loading or saving) would cause stripes to appear on the screen. It also controlled the keyboard, causing the screen to flicker at each keypress, but the keyboard was built-in and so it doesn't count ...


3

The Commodore 64 used a single CIA for both the keyboard and joystick (or paddles). This made reading both the keyboard and the joystick at the same time a bit of challenge, see this answer for details (complete with schematics). As for an explanation of "why", I guess the answer is always "to save parts and make it cheaper".


2

Several BASIC dialects have DIV and MOD operators, which return the quotient and remainder respectively from integer division. This is nearly equivalent to using / and % operators on integers in C. They are infix operators, even though their syntax is a keyword rather than a symbol. Conversely, the / operator in most BASICs performs floating-point ...


1

I think the canonical example from the 16-bit era is the two ports on the Macintosh provided by a single Zilog 8530 and able to be used for serial, printer, modem, and AppleTalk networking based on user configuration. Of course this was influenced by the modem and printer port on the 8-bit Apple //c, but those ports relied on 2 independent 6551 UARTs. In ...


1

For anyone unfamiliar with mathematics the answer is simple. After trying brute force I found that the format is sometimes confusingly different than pencil and paper. Here it is. print 124 MOD 34 22


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