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27 votes
Accepted

Did the UNIVAC I really have a 2.25 MHz clock speed?

I find this clock speed pretty fast compared to the stated number of operations per second. Because it's a serial architecture. Serial architectures access one bit at a time and process one bit at a ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

Why did the UNIVAC 1100-series Exec-8 O/S call the @ character "master space?"

TL;DR: It's what FIELDATA called the code at position (1).000.000. FIELDATA's Primary Code Table was the default code used for UNIVAC 1100 systems. Why did the UNIVAC 1100-series Exec-8 O/S call the ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
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9 votes

Did the UNIVAC I really have a 2.25 MHz clock speed?

The machine is primarily based on mercury-delay-line storage. A mercury delay line will accept pulses and one end, and output a matching sequence of pulses out the other end after a certain amount of ...
supercat's user avatar
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6 votes

Did the UNIVAC I really have a 2.25 MHz clock speed?

Did the UNIVAC I really have a 2.25 MHz clock speed? Yes. According to the Univac I Maintenance Manual, the master oscillator ran at 2.25 megacycles per second. See Figure 4-1, page 4-6, reproduced ...
dave's user avatar
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6 votes

Did any 16-bit or 36-bit computer instruction set ever include 4x4 or 6x6 bit-matrix operations?

I don't know if it counts as a 16-bit historical computer, but there were a number of 80287 clones. One of them, from IIT, added a F4x4 instruction that operated on the entire FP stack to perform ...
mcleod_ideafix's user avatar
5 votes

Did any 16-bit or 36-bit computer instruction set ever include 4x4 or 6x6 bit-matrix operations?

I think the big question you have to ask here is: What would such an instruction have been useful for? Single-bit data types don't usually go together with matrix operations. I've looked at some ...
Chromatix's user avatar
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3 votes

How did a UNIVAC predict the results of the 1952 U.S. Presidential election?

Seems like it was designed by Grace Hopper / Remington Rand: Navy mathematician Grace Murray Hopper worked for Remington Rand with a team of programmers who input voting statistics from earlier ...
dashnick's user avatar
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