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17

The data pin-outs are the same, assuming a reasonably “new” 5.25” drive, not an early ‘80s model. It was a common upgrade to replace the second 5.25” drive on an older machine with a 3.5” one, so you could have a choice of format depending on your needs. They were interchangeable. You might have an issue with the power though. I don’t remember seeing a 5....


12

The device was called the MindDrive, from a company called "The Other 90%". It had a few games available including MindSkier, which was a downhill slalom game. Nothing in particular ever happened to it, it just never caught on. The technology really has nothing to do with brainwaves at all; it's just measuring the conductance of your finger. At worst, it's ...


12

Not at all. Well, at least not with any simple plug / converter. USB works completely differently from PS/2; any converter will need an active component. And no, those pesky PS/2-USB plugs that were given away with many keyboards during the 2000s are not active, but just rearrange wires - the keyboard controllers themselves were able to handle either ...


10

The short version of this answer boils down to something pretty simple and easy: Cheap, easy: try more different keyboards with your passive PS/2<->USB pin adapter OR Not cheap, still easy: buy a really expensive, nice keyboard that also works over PS/2 and take it as an excuse to get yourself a nice keyboard for day-to-day computing! The ...


10

There are some USB drives which support double-density disks and formats, but as you suspect, not all of them. It is still worth trying a plain format a: to see what it does — USB drives control formatting themselves, so this should do the right thing if it supports double-density disks. If you have a Linux system handy, you can determine your drives’ ...


10

Note: As I don't have a computer with Windows 10, I do not know whether it helps there as well, but this worked for me on Windows 7. I do have a Fuji USB floppy drive (Not sure if this is the same type, but read on). It worked well with 1.44M floppies, but did not work for 720k disks with the original driver. The following procedure made it work: Go to ...


10

File System Windows 98 typically uses FAT32, whereas later versions of Windows support NTFS. While it should recognize a flash drive at the low-level hardware no matter what file system is installed, it will likely not show it 100% correctly if it is using NTFS instead of FAT32. My advice is to format the flash drive on a newer computer/OS using FAT32 (...


10

Firstly, a little bit of background information. The Gotek is designed to work with a wide number of computers, not just IBM-compatibles. The original standard for floppy drives (designed by Shugart) allowed for up to four floppy drives to be connected to one controller. The controller would indicate which drive it wanted to communicate with by activating a ...


8

I successfully got the RK-P400C printing from a serial console (minicom on Linux) today. Here's how to do it for future reference...;) The DB25 connector on the right side is a 25 pin serial port. At the top right of the typewriter there are sets of switches to select font and size, at the far right of those are two switches with the labels "KBI, KBII, EXT" ...


7

The laptop you describe is unlikely to be able to support USB ports, for hardware reasons. But there may be an alternative solution. The first USB standard (version 1.0) was published in 1996, but didn't really gain traction in the PC market until version 1.1 was released in 1998. The PCI bus standard had been published in 1992, and by the mid 1990s it was ...


7

The connections on the 34-pin ribbon cables are identical, but the size of the connectors are different. You can get ready made cables with both 5.25 and 3.5 connectors, for example http://www.cablesonline.com/36unflopdriv.html (and of course from Ebay also). These are likely to be more reliable than trying to wire a 5.25 connector onto a 3.5-sized cable by ...


7

Your best option is probably to skip Windows entirely. A Linux livecd will be able to read your filesystem, and has the drivers to use your USB ports built-in. My personal preference would be for System Rescue CD - it requires a Pentium or newer, but other than that, should support almost any hardware.


7

I don't think anyone sells something like that in one piece. There are, however, components on the market that should allow you to build that from scratch: A GoTek or HxC that behaves like a "real" floppy An old Floppy-to-USB adapter that was used to connect "real" floppies over USB. I don't think they're still made, so you would need to source one from ...


6

I found that more recent versions of Windows no longer support the /F: parameter. However, (with internal floppy drives at least) I've been able to format 720K with /T:80 /N:9 for 80 tracks and 9 sectors.


6

The FreeDOS kernel doesn’t support USB drives on its own. When you boot from a USB drive, the CSM makes it available through the BIOS 13h services, so it appears to DOS as a “standard” drive and everything works fine. When you boot from your SATA drive, the CSM doesn’t set anything up for your USB drive (although in some cases it can be induced to do so) ...


6

One solution is to use a USB-to-Floppy interface adapter. One brand of these is Gotek. You can even mount it in a drive bay, perhaps in place of the original floppy drive. The computer will think it's reading a floppy disk when it's actually reading a floppy image file on a USB stick.


5

Windows 98 doesn't come with any drivers built-in for the USB Mass Storage class. Fortunately, there are some generic drivers available, such as from here: http://www.technical-assistance.co.uk/kb/usbmsd98.php. I found this site by searching the web for "windows 98 usb mass storage driver" - other sites are available with similar drivers. You'll need the ...


4

There's no way a USB anything can transparently emulate a floppy drive without a driver being preinstalled. The traditional PC floppy drive was an ISA device and appeared on specific I/O ports (0x3F0 to 0x3F6 IIRC). Reading and writing to these ports was how you talked to the floppy drive. USB peripherals talk to a USB controller, but do not otherwise ...


4

Most (though not quite all) Android devices support operating the USB port as a USB host, either triggered by the usual OTG role pin on an adapter cable or by vendor-unique software setting. There can be various complex interactions with charging and ability to supply power to a peripheral, but for a low consumption device like a USB serial converter it ...


3

Have you considered a self contained Boot program called "Active@"? I use this. It will install as it's own OS on a flashdrive so long as the motherboard can see the USB flashdrive. A cut down version of Windows comes up and you can make images of any internal drives from there. It's a great comfort when things go awry.. You simply rewrite the drive and ...


3

Back in the days of Windows 9x, the USB drives needed a special driver from their manufacturers (usually on small ~200 MByte format CD). But not many manufacturers provided them, limiting usable USB drives. The USB drives usually work in USB 1.1 ports too without any problems (apart the speed). Some of the newer USB drives still work with Windows 9x (usually ...


3

I'd suggest moving the jumper from S0 to S1 - IBM compatibles expect drives to respond as Unit 1, not Unit 0.


2

A completely different approach is to find an Ethernet card instead and use any available network resource (like a NAS or a Windows share on another host or the internet). I used 3com and xircom cards back then. You can use Win95 or a small 486 Linux distribution without too much elbow grease, and it will probably be the fastest in terms of moving data ...


2

Seems like the answer is NO. While others here have helpfully suggested workarounds to try, the answer as to whether the piece of hardware I asked about exists in a single piece is NO.


2

The OCZ NIA was a device with a similar idea, but possibly with somewhat more advanced hardware, which was available at a later date (circa 2005 or so I think -- Wikipedia has date for when production ceased, but not when it started). It was also somewhat cheaper. If you look around, you can still find these available second hand. Rather than controlling ...


2

I do not expect it is practical. The reason you can connect the Apple to RPi is that the USB port on the RPi is designed to be a host to USB slave devices - for this case, it is hosting a USB slave that does RS-232. And, perhaps more importantly, the RPi has drivers installed that can recognize RS-232 capable hardware and use it as a terminal connection. So ...


2

You can install xp in IDE mode and install the AHCI drivers afterwards, I did this on my netbook several times. I think it goes something like: Set disk controller to IDE mode in bios, and install XP. In device manager go to the disk controller and manually change the driver to the AHCI one. Reboot into bios and change disk controller to AHCI mode. Save and ...


2

Thanks for all the support! I resolved in the following way, hoping this could help someone else with the same doubts in the future. Connectors Jumpers on Gotek Resuming: 2 HxC Gotek drives (SFRM72-TU100K) on a 16bit-based XT-clone (cpu NEC V30 at 8MHz with 640MB RAM), 720Kb each, detected as A: and B:, read/write enabled, working well on MS-DOS (all ...


1

This is not the elegant solution you are requesting, but it will solve the problem: Buy a Tripp-Lite B042 series KVM switch. Specifications: https://assets.tripplite.com/product-pdfs/en/b042008.pdf This has two USB inputs for a keyboard and mouse, and outputs to USB or PS/2. There is an adapter that connects to the USB output connector to make it work as ...


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